Baxters of Leiston

Town sign Leiston

Leiston

Leiston is situated 2 miles from the coast, four miles north of Aldeburgh and four miles east of Saxmundham. The church is dedicated to St Margaret and the parish registers date back to the Tudor times. Near the church is the fourteenth century abbey built by Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk. The abbey was dissolved by Henry VII and much of the stone has been robbed and reused in building in the local area. The parish includes the hamlet of Sizewell now famous for it’s nuclear power station.

Thomas Baxter (1712 – 1760)

Thomas moved with his father, another Thomas, from Woodbridge to settle in Leiston.

Marriage

Marriage License Bond: 13 Feb 1735/6 – Thomas Baxter and Sarah Mayhew. Carpenter singleman and singlewoman both of Layston. To be married at Kettleburgh.

Thomas married twice, having searched the parish registers neither of these marriages occurred in Leiston. Thomas’s first wife was Sarah Mayhew (d. 1742) who he married on the 13th February, 1735, Kettleburgh. His second wife was Barbara (d. 1764) who he married around 1745.

Children

Thomas and Sarah had the following:

Baptized Name Comment Where
03 Apr 1737 Thomas Son of Thomas and Sarah Baxter Parish Church of Leiston
19 Nov 1738 William Son of Thomas and Sarah Baxter Parish Church of Leiston
05 Oct 1740 Sarah Daughter of Thomas and Sarah Baxter Parish Church of Leiston
21 Nov 1742 Joseph Son of Thomas and Sarah Baxter Pariah Church of Leiston

Thomas and Barbara had the following:

Baptized Name Comment Where
21 Sep 1746 Joseph Son of Thomas and Barbara Baxter Parish Church of Leiston

Employment

Will Consons of Aldeburgh, Suffolk was apprenticed to Thos Baxter of Leiston, Suffolk, wheelwright, 1738.
Henry Ellis was apprenticed to Thos Baxter of Leiston, Suffolk, carpenter, 1746.
Thomas Frankland was apprenticed to Thomas Baxter of Leiston, Suffolk, carpenter, 1750.
John Gayford was apprenticed to Thomas Baxter of Leiston, Suffolk, carpenter, 1756

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
Ipswich Journal 26 Oct 1754 Stolen or Stray’d from Thomas Baxter, Carpenter, in Leiston, near Saxmundham, Suffolk
A LITTLE BLACK MARE
About 12 or 13 Hands high, ten years old, with standing Mane and cut Tail, a star on her Forehead, a little white upon three of her feet down at the forelock, when lost she had a colt taken off her about Ten days.
Whoever will give notice of the said Mare to Thomas Baxter, aforesaid, shall be well rewarded for the same.
Ipswich Journal 30 May 1761 On Monday the Eight Day of June, 1761, at the Dwelling House of the late THOMAS BAXTER, at LEISTON, in the County of Suffolk, Carpenter, deceased, will be exposed to sale, all the HOUSEHOLD GOODS and FURNITURE, also a large Assortment of Carpenter’s and Joyners WORKING TOOLS, Vz A set of {Hemp} jacks, shackles, a great many planes or various sorts, saws, Augurs, &C.
At which Time (or before) and Place, it is desired, that all who stand indebted to the said Thomas Baxter do pay the same to Barbara Baxter, his widow and Administratrix; and also all who have any demands to send in their Accounts, in order to receive their equal Proportion so far as the Effects will amount.

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
24 Nov 1742 Sarah Baxter  
05 Jul 1760 Thos Baxter  
28 Mar 1764 Barbara Baxter  

What happened to the children of Thomas Baxter and Sarah Mayhew of Leiston?

William Baxter (1738 – ?)

The following information is based on the assumption that since William was born in Leiston he was the William Baxter that was apprenticed to Benj Bayes. However there is a possibility that the following information belongs to a different William Baxter that of William Baxter born in 1742 Melton the son of Robert Baxter and Mary Allen. One of these two William Baxters made Perukes and had a shop in Melton.

Employment

Wm Baxter was apprenticed to Benj Bayes of Leiston, Suffolk, peruke maker (perruke – wig maker) for £7, 1755.

Sarah Baxter (1740 – ?)

Marriage

Sarah married James Rosher. From the parish registers of Leiston:
"James Rosher single man of the parish of Theberton and Sarah Baxter single woman of this parish both in the County of Suffolk were married in this church by banns this twenty-seventh day of July, 1767. In the presence of William Garrod, Elizabeth Holden and William Gildersleeves."

Joseph Baxter (1742 – 1742)

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
16 Dec 1742 Joseph Baxter Infant

What happened to the child of Thomas and Barbara Baxter of Leiston?

Joseph Baxter (1746 – 1826)

It is possible that this was the Joseph that lives in Alderton Suffolk. Considering the number of Baxter burials in Alderton it is likely that Joseph had children, but without checking the parish registers I can not be certain.

Marriage

Joseph married Hannah Ashkettle (1745 – 1802) on 31st January, 1775, Boyton.

Death

Alderton St Andrew

Buried Name Comment
07 Dec 1802 Hannah Baxter Aged 57
26 Jan 1826 Joseph Baxter Aged 79

What happened to the children of Jonathan Baxter and Scipia Artis of Leiston?

William Baxter (1787 – 1815)

William moved away from Leiston and spent time in both Tunstall and Snape.

Marriage

William married Sarah Gillingham (1788 – 184?) the daughter of Anne Gillingham, on the 7th October, 1806, Snape. After William’s death Sarah married Jacob Hammond (1792 – 1863) on the 18th November, 1816, Snape. Sarah died between the 1841 census and the summer of 1849 when Jacob remarries.

Children

William and Sarah had the following:

Born Baptized Name Comment Where
30 Sep 1807 25 Oct 1807 Charlotte William and Sarah Baxter, late Gillingham Parish Church of Snape
27 Jan 1810 18 Feb 1810 William William and Sarah Baxter, late Gillingham Parish Church of Snape
21 Dec 1811 26 Jan 1812 Mary Anne* William and Sarah Baxter of Tunstall Parish Church of Snape
  27 Mar 1814 Sarah Anne William and Sarah Baxter Parish Church of Snape

*Baptised as Sarah Ann in Snape parish registered, buried Mary Ann in Tunstall parish registers.

Death

Snape St John the Baptist

Buried Name Comment
27 Jul 1815 Wm Baxter Of Snape, aged 30, husband

Maria Baxter (1790 – 1793)

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
02 Jun 1793 Maria Baxter Infant daughter of Jonathan and Scipia Baxter late Scipia Artis spinster

Benjamin Artis Baxter (1792 – 1854)

Benjamin left Leiston and spent most of his life in Walpole.

Marriage

Marriage License: 22 Sep 1815 – Artis Baxter of Walpole single man and Harriet Barber of Halesworth single woman.

Marriage License Bond: 21 Sep 1815 – Artis Baxter and Harriet Barber. Single man of Walpole and single woman of Halesworth. To be married at Halesworth. James Barber, the father of Harriet, a minor.

Benjamin married Harriot Barber (1796 – 1847) the daughter of James Barber and Sarah Cotton (widow). From the parish register of Halesworth:
"Artis Baxter of Walpole single man and Harriot Barber of this parish single woman married in this church by licence and consent of her father on this twenty-first day of September, 1815. In the presence of William Jillings and Hester Jillings."

Children

Benjamin and Harriot had the following:

Baptized Name Comment Where
20 Oct 1816 Harriet Daughter of Artis and Harriet Parish Church of Walpole

Military Details

24th Dragoon Guards
Atlas Baxter
Born at Beccles
County of Suffolk  
Age: 16 years  
Capacity: Basket Maker
Height: 5 feet 4 3/4 Hair: Light
Complexion: Fresh Eyes: Dark
Marks:
Attestation: 22nd day of Oct 1807

Served in Canada

Census

1841

Dwelling – Temple Covey, Heveningham
Name Age Occupation Born in County
Benjamin Baxter 45 Game Keeper Y
Harriot Baxter 42   Y

1851

Dwelling – Street, Walpole
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Benjamin Artis Baxter Head Wid 58 Retired Game Keeper Leiston
Sarah Vincent Housekeeper Unmar 24 Housekeeper Walpole

Directories

Directory Name Year Place Private / Commercial Name and Service
Suffolk History Gazetteer and Directory 1844 Heveningham Commercial Baxter,Artis, gamekeeper

Death

Walpole St Mary

Buried Name Comment
12 Mar 1847 Harriet Baxter Of Walpole, aged 49
27 Jun 1854 Benjamin Artis Baxter Of Walpole, aged 62

Charlotte Baxter (1794 – 1863)

Marriage

Marriage License Bond: 02 Nov 1812 – James Cornell and Charlotte Baxter. Single man and carpenter of Leiston and single woman of Walpole. To be married at Leiston. Jonathan Baxter father of the said Charlotte.

Charlotte married James Cornell/Cannell/Cunnell (1785 – 1843) the son of Joseph Cunnell and Sarah Bicker. From the parish registers of Leiston:
"James Cornell, single man of this parish and Charlotte Baxter of the parish of Walpole in this County a minor by and with the consent of Jonathan Baxter her father married in this church by licence this third day of November, 1812. In the presence of Martha Baxter, James Artis and Robt Gildersleeves."

Martha Baxter (1795 – 1865)

Marriage

Martha married William Mulley (1791 – 1822) the son of Robert Mulley and Mary Paxman. From the parish registers of Walpole:
"William Mulley of the parish of Tunstall single man and Martha Baxter of this parish single woman were married in this church by banns of this twenty-ninth day of September, 1818."

Martha’s second husband was Jabez Waller (1789 – 1848) the son of John Waller and Hannah Nightingale. From the parish registers of Saxmundham:
"Jabez Waller of this parish widower and Martha Mulley of this parish widow were married in this church by banns this fourth day of October, 1825.

Edwin Baxter (1797 – 1802)

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
15 May 1802 Edwin Baxter Son of Jonathan and Scipia Baxter, aged 4

Scipia Baxter (1801 – 1870)

Marriage

Scipia married a Charles Groom (1802 – 1880) son of Francis Groom and Letitia French. From the parish registers of Snape:
"Charles Groom from this parish single man and Scipia Baxter from this parish single woman married in this church on this twenty-fifth day of October, 1825."

Anna Baxter (1802 – 1853)

Marriage

Anna married John Hilling (1808 – 1865) the son of John Hilling and Elizabeth Ward. From the parish registers of Snape:
"John Hilling of the parish of Aldeburgh single man and Anna Baxter from this parish single woman married in this church on this sixteenth day of May, 1831."

Harriot Baxter (1804 – 1831)

Marriage

Harriot married a Samuel French (1799 – 1853) the son of Philip French and Sarah Groom. From the parish registers of Snape:
"Samuel French of this parish single man and Harriot Baxter of the same single woman were married in this church by banns of this fourteenth day of July, 1825."

What happened to the children of Joseph Baxter and Sarah Button of Leiston?

Charles Baxter (1790 – 1878)

Charles moved from Leiston and settled in Ipswich. He had no children.

Marriage

Marriage License Bond: 13 Jan 1818 – Charles Baxter and Mary Ransome. Shopkeeper and single man of Ipswich St Mary Le Tower and single woman of Grundisburgh. To be married at Grundisburgh.

Charles married Mary Ransom(e) Graver (1796 – 1867) the daughter of Sarah Graver and Robert Ransom(e). From the parish registers of Grundisburgh:
"Charles Baxter of the parish of St Mary Tower, Ipswich and Mary Ransome Graver of this parish married in this church by licence on this thirteenth day of January, 1818."

Employment

Chas Baxter was apprenticed to Wm Flick of Leiston, Suffolk, grocer & c, 1807

Census

1841

Dwelling – St Paul’s, Norwich
Name Age Occupation Born in County
Mary Baxter 50 Milliner Y
Chas. Baxter 50 Pattern M Y

1851

Dwelling – Stone Hamlet, Ipswich St Clements
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Baxter Lodger M 60 Coal Porter Leiston
Mary Baxter Lodger M 50   Ludham, Norfolk

1861

Dwelling – Fore Hamlet, Ipswicxh St Clements
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Mary Baxter Boarder M 63 Late draper Ludham, Norfolk

Directories

Directory Name Year Place Private / Commercial Name and Service
Pigot’s Directory of Suffolk 1823 Ipswich Commercial Hayward & Baxter – Merchants

Crime

Name Age Session Trial Date Charge Out come
Charles Baxter   Norwich Jul 1828 Conspiracy to defraud Imprisonment 2 years & £50 fine

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
Bury and Norwich Post 28 Jan 1818 Married
Wednesday se’nnight, Mr Charles Baxter, linen-draper, of Ipswich, to Miss Ransome Graver, of Grundisburgh.
The Ipswich Journal 13 Jul 1822 New Waterloo Warehouse, Saint Matthew’s Street, Ipswich
C. Baxter
Respectfully solicits the attention of the public to a large stock of linen and woollen drapery, haberdashery, hosiery, &c which he is now selling at very reduced prices; consisting of Irish Linens, from 6d to 2s per yard, all of which are marked with plain figures, the selling price; Kidderminster carpets, yard-wide, from 2s 3d to 3s good patterns and bright colours; ladies white silk hoses 2s 6d, black ditto 4s; black and coloured twill’d and plan garments, only 3s per yard; black and coloured bombazines, 10d.; cotton bed ticks, 6d to 12d. per yard; double wrapped linen ditto, warranted not to lose the feathers, 16d to 2s per yard; book, cambrie, mull, jaconet, and figured muslin; about half the usual prices; cotton hose, 7d per pair; Gentlemen’s white cotton braces, very stout and wide, only 6d per pair, generally sold 2s; gentlemen’s pink and lilac neck handkerchiefs, old 9d each; real Suffolk hemp cloth 10d per yd; white sheetings, 6d 9d 13d and real hemp 1s ½d, yard wide, 20d per yard, nankeen 5d per year; superfine blue cloths, 2 yards wide 8s 6d per yard; very best 14s; good and large umbrella 2s each; and a large assortment of ribbons less than half price.
Ipswich, July 12th 1822
The Ipswich Journal 30 Nov 1822 & 07 Dec 1822 A most describable situation for Trade In Ipswich
An-old Established (Ready Moneyed)
Linen & Woollen Draper shop
By Mr Colchester
At the Golden Lion Tavern, in Ipswich
On Friday December 12th 1822
At Twelve O’clock
All that old-established well – accustomed shop, now in full trade, and large convenient House and Premises, in the occupation of Mr Charles Baxter in the most advantages part of St Matthew’s Street Ipswich.
Comprising on the basement, 2 front shops, 1 back ditto, an entrance hall, kitchen and back house. First floor, capital front sitting-room and 3 bedrooms, 3 large attics, a good cellar, and an excellent walled-in garden.
The premises are well supplied with water, and from the situation and convenience, a most lucrative business in now carried on at a small expense.
Possession either at Christmas or Lady
The stock and furniture to be taken by valuation.
For further particulars apply on the premises or to the Auctioneer, Woodbridge and Ipswich.
The Ipswich Journal 26 Feb 1825 & 05 Mar 1825 On Monday, February 28,
Selling Off at Prime Cost,
All the stock of linen Drapery, Haberdashery
Hosiery, Gloves, & c. of
Mr G Edwards,
Tavern Street Ipswich
Next door but one to the White Horse Inn,
The stock, consisting of Irish linen, sheeting, blankets, flannels, bed ticks, counterpanes, plain, figured and stripped stuffs, black and coloured bombazines and Norwich crapes, olive velveteens, cords, furnitures and prints, muslins, imitation and silk shawls, Urlings’s, lace, thread, quillings, plain and figured, wide hats, ribbons, ladies’ and gentlemen’s silk handkerchiefs, hosiery, haberdashery, gloves, &c. and every article of the above line, all in good condition.
A large assortment of ladies’ and children’s fashionable stays; also a quantity of soiled ditto, so be sold much under the manufacturing price.
All persons who stand indebted to G Edwards are requested to pay their accounts within one month from the date here of, to Mr G Edwards or Mr C Baxter, New Street, who are authorized to receive same.
The London Gazette 28 May 1825 Notice is hereby given that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned James Hayward and Charles Baxter, as Corn and Coal merchants, and maltsters, at Ipswich, in the County of Suffolk was this day dissolved by mutual consent, the said Charles Baxter retiring from the concern, which in future be carried on at the same place by the said James Hayward, upon his own separate account; and all persons indebted to the said co-partnership are requested forthwith to settle their respective accounts with James Hayward. Dated this 24th day of May 1825.
Jas Hayward
Chas Baxter
The Ipswich Journal 10 Jun 1826 Ipswich June 2nd 1826
Dissolution of partnership
G and E Edwards,
Tavern Street
Return their sincere thanks to the inhabitants of Ipswich, and its vicinity, for the liberal encouragement they have experienced; and beg to inform them they have dissolved partnership, and disposed of the concern to Mr C Baxter.
C Baxter
Having taken to himself the above concern of G. and E. Edwards, respectfully solicits the attention of his friends and the public to the remaining part of the stock, which he is now selling off a full 50 per cent less than the former prices, with an addition of fresh goods, which he intends offering remarkably cheap. Ipswich June 2nd 1826
All persons having any demand on the above mentioned firm of Messrs George and Ernest Edwards, are requested to send their accounts to the said Charles Baxter, in order that the same maybe discharged; an all persons who stand indebted to them, are requested forthwith to pay the amount of their respective debts to Mr Baxter, who is duly authorized to redeem the same, or legal measures will be instituted for the recovery thereof without further notice.
The Ipswich Journal 02 Feb 1828 Monday in the Court of King’s Bench, Mr Archbold moved for a writ of Habeas Corpus, to bring up the body of a person named Baxter, committed by the Commissioners of Bankrupts to his Majesty’s gaol of Newgate. On the warrant of commitment a long examination was set forth, and a declaration made, that the answers having been unsatisfactory, the Commissioners had committed Baxter, who was, it appeared, examined as a witness. The Learned Counsel said he was somewhat at a loss to determine upon which of the answers, or refusals to answers, the Commissioners felt dissatisfaction. No doubt at the latter end of the examination there did a[pear some answers not perfectly satisfactory, but these were, he contended, given in reply to questions that the Commissioners had no right to put. They were questions relating to his belief respecting the intentions of his brother on a particular occasions, and he declared that his brother had not made any communications to him in the subject of his affairs.
Lord Tenterden – Will you have a writ, or a rule to show cause?
Mr Archbold preferred the former.
Bury and Norwich Post 13 Feb 1828 Court of King’s Bench, Feb 5.
In the matter of Charles Baxter. – Sir Jas. Scarlett had obtained a rule to shew cause why Chas. Baxter, who had been committed by the Commissioners of Bankrupts for not answering questions to their satisfaction, should not be discharged out of their custody. The questions and answers were read as usual on such occasions, and then Sir James Scarlett contended that the answers were sufficient to satisfy any reasonable mind. – Mr Law and Mr Knight shewed cause against the rule and contended, that the witness had shuffled and equivocated in an extraordinary manner, with a view to obtain for himself an unreasonable advantage over the other creditors under the Commission taken out against his brother, W. Baxter. The Court took time to consider before it gave judgement.
Thursday, Fen 7. – Lord Tentender now stated the opinion of the Court. The Judges, he said, had conferred together; and they thought, that upon the whole matter, it was impossible to see, that the witness had been most unwilling to make a full and fair disclosure of his brother’s (the Bankrupt’s) affairs. It was quite evident that he was endeavouring, as far as he was able, to elude the inquires of the Commissioners. Still it was not clear that the final question on which he was committed, and to which he was required to answer to his belief, was so very material to the subject of inquiry as fully to warrant the commitment. This question related to the fact, whether he believed that his brother had come to him with his Attorney for the purpose of inducing the witness to strike a docket. They might have got at the fact by following up the question with various other inquiries, in a manner much more effectual than asking him his belief. It was not surprising, however that the Commissioners had thought proper to commit this man; but on the whole, the Court was of opinion, that the order of the Commissioners ought to be discharged.
The Ipswich Journal 23 Feb 1828 Whereas a commission of Bankrupt is awarded and issued against Charles Baxter of Ipswich, in the County of Suffolk, linen draper and haberdasher, and he being declared a bankrupt is hereby required to surrender himself to the Commissioners in the said commission named, or the major part of them, on the fourth day of March next, at the hour of seven in the evening, and on the eleventh day of the same month of March, and on the eight day of April following, at the hour of eleven in the afternoon of each of the last mentioned day, at the Queen’s Head Inn, in Ipswich aforesaid, and to make a full and true discovery and disclosure of his estate and effects; when and where the creditors are to come prepared to prove their debts, and at the second sitting to choose Assignees, and at the last sitting, the said bankrupt is required to finish his examinations and the creditors are to assent to, or dissent from, the allowance of his certificate. All persons indebted to the said bankrupt, or that have any of his effects, are not to pay or deliver the same, but to whom the commissioners shall appoint, but give notice to Messrs Parson and Lawrence Solicitors, Ipswich or to Mr Samuel Taylor, Solicitor, John Street, Bedford Row London.
London Gazette 26 Feb 1828 Bankrupts –
Baxter Charles, Ipswich Linen Draper and Haberdasher
Bury and Norwich Post 05 Mar 1828 Bankrupts – Tuesday February 26
Baxter Charles, Ipswich, Linen Draper
The Ipswich Journal 22 Mar 1828 Free of Duty
To be sold by Auction
By B. B. Catt
On Monday next, the 25th day of March 1828
Beginning at Eleven O’clock
By order of the Assigners of CHARLES BAXTER a Bankrupt. All the genuine household furniture, household and shop fixtures and other effects, at his dwelling house in Tavern Street, Ipswich. Catalogue of which may be had on application to the Auctioneer.
London Gazette 28 Mar 1828 Bankrupts –
Baxter Charles, Ipswich Linen Draper
Bury and Norwich Post 02 Apr 1828 Bankrupts – Friday March 28
Baxter Charles, Ipswich, Linen Draper
The Ipswich Journal 05 Apr 1828 Bankrupts – Friday
Bankruptcy superseded- Charles Baxter, Ipswich, linen draper and haberdasher.
The Ipswich Journal 19 Apr 1828 At Norwich session of Tuesday last the Grand Jury returned a bill against Charles Baxter, line draper, late of Ipswich; William Baxter late of this city, liner draper and Joseph Baxter, the younger of Sizewell for a conspiracy to cheat the creditors of William Baxter.
William Baxter, John Elliott and Robert Phelp, were indicted for a conspiracy to defraud the creditors of William Baxter.
They were guilty and John Elliott was sentenced to two years imprisoned in the gaol, and to pay a fine of 100£ to the King, and Phelp to one years imprisonment, and to pay a fine of 50£ and both to be imprisoned till their respective fines were paid.
The Ipswich Journal 10 May 1828 Tuesday in the Court of King’s Bench, ex-parte Baxter. Mr. Kelly moved the Court for a rule to show cause why a writ of Habeas Corpus, to bring up the body of Charles Baxter, who had been committed by the Commissioners of Bankrupts, in order to be discharged, should not be granted. This person had been before committed by the same Commissioners, and has been brought up by Habeas Corpus and discharged. The man had been examined on the bankruptcy of his brother, and had not answered in a manner satisfactory to the Commissioners, and they committed him; after his discharge, the Commissioners called him up again for examination, and he having again refused to answer to their satisfaction, they again committed him. The ground on which he applied for the rule was, that the questions to which Baxter had refused to give satisfactory answers were not material. Rule granted.
The Ipswich Journal 26 Jul 1828 Thursday in the Court of Chancery – Habeas Corpus – In re Baxter, a bankrupt. – It will be recollected, from the proceedings which have taken place on this subject in the Court of King’s Bench, as well as from the application heretofore made in this Court, that the brother of the bankrupt had been committed to the Fleet Prison by the Commissioners of Bankruptcy, for not having satisfactorily answered certain questions put to him on his examination before them. After his first committal, he applied to be again examined, for the purpose of explaining his former evidence; but the Commissioners not thinking that he had satisfactorily explained certain matters, which they believed to be within his knowledge, he was again committed to prison. The prisoner having been this day brought up under a writ of Habeas Corpus.
Mr. Pepys and Mr. Barber applied for his discharge, on the ground that his answers, though not as full and satisfactory as might be wished, were still as full and as satisfactory as the nature of the questions would admit of, particularly on his last examination. It had been objected to him that he had not disclosed some circumstances connected with a number of sovereigns belonging to the bankrupt, which had been seen in the prisoner’s possession. But, upon his second examination, he had answered every question put to him on that subject; and if hi answers did not convey all the information required, the fault lay with the Commissioners, who had not so shaped their questions as to elicit that information. When he came before them a second time, instead of directing his attention to the particular points upon which information was required, they read over the entire information of his former evidence to him, and then called on him to supply deficiencies. This mode of proceeding, the Learned Gentlemen contended was merely a trap for the witness, and was not calculated to attain the desired object, as it failed to direct the mind of the witness to the points which the Commissioners sought to elucidate.
Mr Rose appeared for the application.
The Lord Chancellor thought that the whole proceeding was a tissue of fraud and perjury. There were no grounds for saying that the witness was not fully apprised of the particular subject upon which explanation was desired. He well knew the cause of his former commitment, and that, on his coming before the Commissioners the second time, his explanation ought to be direct to that point. If his object had been to tell the whole truth, the question of the Commissioners, were sufficiently comprehensive to let in all he had to disclose. Instead of answering the questions put to him directly, he prevaricated and fenced in every possible way; and, taking all the circumstances of the case into consideration, his Lordship did not think he would be acting fairly by the Commissioner if he discharged the prisoner. The prisoner evidently know more than he had disclosed and more than he wished to disclose. His Lordship subsequently agreed to allow the prisoner to go before the Commissioners again upon his paying the costs of this examination.
Norwich Mercury 26 July 1828 CITY SESSION’S concluded from our last. [This Trial being of considerable importance to the Commercial World, has induced to give the evidence at length]
Charles Baxter and Joseph Baxter were indicted for having conspired with Wm. Baxter, a bankrupt, who had absconded, and other persons unknown, defraud the creditors of the said Win. Baxter.
Henry Ashurst, of London, solicitor for the creditors, produced commission issued in the country against Wm. Baxter on the petition of Charles Baxter, which was subsequently superseded, and a new commission issued in London the petition of Lawrence and Co. He also produced two acceptances proving that Win. Baxter was indebted at that time.
Robt. Marston proved that he was in the month of November last acting as the attorney of Charles Baxter in Wm. Baxter’s affairs, and that by Charles’ direction he wrote letters to William’s creditors stating that his stock amounted to 2000l. and his debts to nearly six thousand.
Robert Telford Elliott—Knows Wm. Baxter; remembers his opening a shop in February, 1827 was in the habit seeing him; saw in his possession a letter from Charles Baxter to Wm. Baxter about three months before his failure witness remembers some part of the contents of the letter; it is about eleven months since he saw it; he read it himself; was going with Wm. Baxter to the World’s End, and Wm. Baxter produced the letter; one part of the letter was, take more money, sell for 5 to 7 1/2 per cent, under cost price; buy one mouth’s consumption in the room of two, by that means you will stand on your legs so much the longer; you had better take another shop, as you can buy plenty of goods now; I shall be over at Norwich in day or two, and will then write you what letters you want; you must let me have all the money you can; the letter was signed Charles Baxter; remembers Wm. Baxter’s failure; had some conversation with Wm. Baxter previous the bills being put out, offering a reward for apprehending Wm. Baxter; Charles Baxter was present; it was at his house at Ipswich; the conversation was about removing some goods, and C. Baxter said he (W. Baxter) must go to Holland, and he would send him so much a month to live on; William said the goods removed were worth from 10001. to 1200l there were eighteen thousand yards of Gros de Naples; Charles Baxter said he would send him 4l a month; a man might live like a Prince in Holland for a pound a week ; William said if he were allowed a pound week till all the money were spent, he should have nothing to go into business with; Charles said he would send him more as he sold the goods; there was paper on the table with some initials and figures on it written in pencil; witness asked what it was; Charles B. said they were memorandums as to where the goods were which had been removed from Norwich ; he saw it after William left the house in Charles’ possession there were about thirty-five packages mentioned in the paper; about ten were marked R. P. witness asked if that was not Phelp’s; Chas. B. replied it was; witness afterwards went with Wm. Baxter to the Salutation public-house in Ipswich; he asked for a hair trunk, which was delivered to him by some one in the house; he said it contained ribands (ribbons) of the value of about 100l. witness then went with W. Baxter, and saw him off to Sizewell Gap; witness saw C. Baxter the next day, who .told him that some one from Messrs. Green & Ashurst had been through Ipswich, and offered 10 or 20l. to any person who would say where Wm. was; Charles asked witness to go to Norwich and endeavour to see Wm Baxter; if he could not find him there witness was-to go to Huntingfield after him ; afterwards saw Charles Baxter when Phelps was there; Charles Baxter said, what damned fool my brother William is to leave his writing desk laying about, for all the papers between Charles and Wm. Baxter were there since the commencement of the business; if that’s found I shall be ruined; Phelps said I heard they were going to search Sizewell, but rode before them and got it out of the way.
Cross-examined.—Was in Court about three months since; was subpoenaed; was not examined ; did then stand at the bar; there was an indictment against witness; a linen draper; never served an apprenticeship; was shopman to John Elliott, at Liverpool, about seven years ago; his brother John failed at Liverpool; declined saying whether he had ever said that by that transaction he and his brother saved 1400l. after this failure witness set up business in Ipswich; was in business 23 months, and then failed for 4000l. witness petitioned the Lord Chancellor to supersede the commission, but it was not superseded; witness passed his examination; he believes that his debts and stock amounted to 3000l. does not know that the dividend was only 1 1/2d. in the pound; has not been in business since; now a journeyman, in Norwich, to his father, who carries on business in Norwich; his father has lent him money ; before his failure witness sold 300l. worth goods to Wm. Baxter, but was never paid for them; has seen some of them since which had been removed since the failure of Wm. Baxter; was in prison, in London; may have said that he had puzzled two Counsellors ; never was examined by two Counsellors under Wm. Baxter’s commission; might have said so, but was not then on oath; knows that Charles Baxter was in the habit of sending goods to William for three or four months after he began business; the reason he was not proceeded against on the former indictment was because he had divulged other frauds.
John Baxter—lst cousin of the prisoners; was residing in Ipswich in December last; was examined before the Commissioners on Wm. Baxter’s affairs, and then told what knew ; recollects seeing Charles Baxter, in Ipswich, in December last ; he came to witness’ house; he brought two parcels, and asked witness to take care of them for him; two or three days after he brought three parcels more ; he said he was going the following day to fetch his brother, upon which he would have two more valuable parcels; he said it would late in the evening when he should bring them, and asked witness to set up till his return; he came the next night between eleven and twelve with the two parcels; it was about the time of Wm. Baxter’s bankruptcy; about a week after witness called at Charles Baxter’s; witness had a sack; Charles said, well .John bor, you are just the person I wanted to see; I have got two parcels I want you to put with the others; the parcels were large; carried them one at a time in the sack to his house; saw one of them opened by C. Baxter, and some black silk taken out, and observed there was more in it.— Charles Baxter told him afterwards there was a hell of a piece of work about his brother William, at Norwich ; he did not consider the parcels safe at witness’ house, and where they could be removed as a place of greater safety ; could they not be removed his wife’s father’s. Witness removed them to a false ceiling in his house. Witness’ goods were after- sold under execution from the Crown for duty. Witness removed the goods to Mrs. Palmer’s, at Ipswich, before the sale, and afterwards brought them back. Whenever Charles Baxter saw witness, he always enquired whether the goods were safe.— Witness afterwards went to London, and saw Charles Baxter in Newgate, when asked if they were safe. Witness was afterwards arrested for a bill had accepted for Charles Baxter. While in prison, one Charles Guildersleeves, a brother-in-law of Charles Baxter, came to see witness, and brought a letter from Charles Baxter, consequence of which the goods were delivered up.—The letter was produced and read ; it was signed Charles Baxter, and addressed to John Baxter—and was follows : “Dear Sir—As there no doubt will be a striking enquiry about the deficiency of my stock, and as Burch is summoned he may drop a word that may lead suspicion on your part—as such, for your sake as well as mine, I am of opinion it will be desirable they should be removed. Hope you will give Mr. Gilders the necessary instruction for the accomplishment of the same. Shall be at Ipswich soon, and will give you a call Should you want any cash for your own use you shall have some. Mind what you say to Elliott, as he will do you and me all the harm he can. Treat him coolly and you will much oblige
“Yours, &c.”
When witness was London, Joseph Baxter, the defendant, was with him; had conversation about Charles and William’s affairs; Joseph said he was very sorry for his brother William ; that he had got goods of his brother William’s, and that they were rotten because they were confined in a vault underground where they generally kept smuggled goods; that his brother Charles was then in Newgate, and there was no chance of turning them into money. He spoke against Charles; said he was a mean disposition, and would always feather his own nest. He was sorry for his brother William. Witness was one evening sent for to his brother’s house at Ipswich. Witness went and supped there. Mary Ellis, the servant, and Mrs. Baxter were there. After supper Charles Baxter desired them to go to bed; when they were gone he told witness he had got two or three more parcels which he wanted witness to take, and he was to take them next morning, as It would look ill to have parcels going out of the house that time of the night.
Robert Burch—ls a linen draper; lived with Chas. Baxter; remembers Wm. Baxter’s failure at Norwich ; remembers his master coming from Norwich about that time ; he came by the mail. Sent witness for John Baxter next morning; when witness came back saw about 100 pieces of silk handkerchiefs in the back shop, and about 20 pieces of lutestring and persian—about half a dozen pairs of white silk stockings they were not there when witness went out.— When witness returned he asked Charles Baxter where the silk handkerchiefs came from. He said they came from Bradberry’s; they were d—d good fellows. Witness’ master always told him what orders he gave had given none at that time ; there was no wrapper or invoice. The handkerchiefs were put in regular order, and put in the window; they were marked with W. Baxter’s selling mark. Wm. and Chas. Baxter’s marks were similar, such marks could not have been put on during his absence. The silks were in folds; the usual way by wholesale houses is to pack them on rollers. Witness and Chas. Baxter afterwards put them on rollers. The handkerchiefs were afterwards packed up in two paper parcels, and the silks were taken off the rollers and put in the back shop. This took place a fortnight before C. Baxter was summoned to London. Witness saw the goods on a Saturday night, and missed them on Monday morning. He was sent by his master to John Baxter’s to say he wanted to speak him; saw him with his master on that day. When witness saw his master packing up the goods, be asked him what for; he said there was duty laid on them, and if any one asked him if they had any handkerchiefs, he was to say no. When witness went in to dinner, he saw some silk rollers burning on the fire, which it was not usual to burn, but they were taken care of.
Mary Ellis—Was living with Charles Baxter, at Ipswich, the end of the last year and beginning of the present; heard of William Baxter’s bankruptcy about a week or fortnight before Charles Baxter went to Norwich; when he came back he brought large box and a parcel; he came in at the back entrance; witness assisted bringing the box and parcel; on the lid of the box was Wm. Baxter, linen draper, Norwich ; the next morning the box was unpacked ; Burch was sent out for John Baxter; witness did not see the box unpacked, but saw some things afterwards in a room upstairs; there were two pieces of satin, veils, silk handkerchiefs, and silk stockings Charles Baxter afterwards brought the lid the box and told her to burn it; witness afterwards burned some rollers by his direction; was not the habit of burning rollers; this was just before her master went examined before the Commissioners; recollects Guildersleeves coming down ; Charles Baxter was at that time absent; recollects Elliott and Phelps being at her master’s; Mr. Baxter said if the desk was found there was one letter in it which would ruin him; Phelps said he had taken care it.
Robert Gissing- Was shopman to Wm Baxter; one evening, few days before his failure, Wm. Baxter came home late at night, and said he wanted witness to pick out some goods for his brother Charles Persians, satins, sarsnets, and Bandana handkerchiefs were picked out and packed by Wm. Baxter; he took them upstairs into the tea room; they were taken away next morning, and Wm. Baxter said he had taken them to his brother, at the Rampant Horse, St. Stephen’s; had seen goods removed before, but whether entered or where they went to, witness did not know; Phelps and John Elliott and Win. Baxter were present on another occasion, when some goods were removed; Wm. Baxter said they were going to Phelps’ house. [A very large trunk filled with silks and other goods was produced.] Witness identified some goods produced as those taken away.
Cross-examined.—Was a witness on a trial at the last Sessions, and then swore contrary to what he had previously sworn before the Commissioners under Wm. Baxter’s bankruptcy, because he was informed they could not administer an oath.
Joseph Grigson—ls managing clerk to Wilson and Co. of London, wholesale warehousemen, who supplied goods to Wm. Baxter; witness identified three pieces of Bandana handkerchiefs as part of the goods sold.
George Herbert Ladberry—ls clerk to an accountant in London; witness took the box produced at Cotton’s wharf; it was Charles Baxter’s trunk; Charles Baxter, who was apprehended from information received at Radcliffe Highway, went to the wharf with witness and Mr. Parrington; the bookkeeper recognized Charles Baxter, and said he had booked himself for Liverpool by a fictitious name, by a vessel which had dropped down the river; he had a trunk aboard, and the vessel was only waiting for the Captain and Mr. Baxter to go on board, and would sail; Mr. Parrington, Baxter, Mr. Green, and the wharfinger went after the vessel, and brought back the box produced ; the direction on the box was C Button, Liverpool; C. Baxter had shipped himself by that name, and a letter was produced in C. Baxter’s hand-writing, showing that he had taken such name, which completed the case for the prosecution.
The Court sentenced Charles Baxter to pay a fine of £5O, and to imprisoned two years in Gaol, and acquitted Joseph Baxter.
Bury and Norwich Post 05 Mar 1867 Died
On the 25th ult., at Ipswich, Mary wife of Charles Baxter, formerly linen draper, of that town.
The Ipswich Journal 06 Mar 1867 Baxter -25th ult., at St Clement’s Ipswich after a long of affliction 22 years, borne with Christian patience, Mary, the wife of Charles Baxter, formerly a linen draper of the above town.

Death

Ipswich Cemetery

Buried Name Comment
02 Mar 1867 Mary Baxter Of Fore Hamlet St Clement’s Ipswich, died 25th February aged 69
04 Jan 1879 Charles Baxter Of Ipswich St Clement’s Union House, grocer, died 31st December, aged 89

Sophia Baxter (1791 – 1869)

Marriage

Sophia married George Holden (1785 – 1818). From the parish registers of Leiston:
"George Holden of this parish single man and Sophia Baxter of the same, single woman, married in this church by licence this twenty-ninth day of October, 1812. In the presence of Betsey Baxter and Robt Gildersleeves."

Joseph Baxter (1793 – 1866)

Joseph moved around spending time in Great Glemham, Aldringham, Worlingworth, Sweffling and finally Rendham.

Marriage

Joseph married Mary Pipe (1796 – 1874) the daughter of Samuel Pipe and Ann Wright. From the parish registers of Leiston:
"Joseph Baxter of this parish single man and Mary Pipe of this parish single woman were married in this church by banns this eighteenth day of November, 1816. In the presence of Betsey Baxter and Tho Taylor."

Children

Joseph and Mary had the following:

Born Baptized Name Comment Where
21 Apr 1817 04 May 1817 Mary Anne Of Sizewell Parish Church of Leiston
17 Apr 1819 23 May 1819 Sophia Of Sizewell Farmer Parish Church of Leiston
05 Aug 1820 28 Jan 1821 Joseph Leiston Dealer Parish Church of Leiston
  23 May 1823 Charles Sizewell Dealer Parish Church of Leiston
  01 May 1825 Samuel Pipe Joseph and Mary Baxter Parish Church of Great Glemham
  03 Sep 1826 Sarah Joseph and Mary Baxter Parish Church of Great Glemham
  03 Mar 1828 Anna Sizewell Farmer Parish Church of Leiston
1834 *08 May 1836 Elizabeth Aldringham Farmer Parish Church of Aldringham
  08 May 1836 Onesimus Benjamin Aldringham Farmer Parish Church of Aldringham
15 Aug 1837 10 Sep 1837 Martha Ann Aldringham Farmer Parish Church of Aldringham

*There is a baptism for Elizabeth on 26 Feb 1834, Parish Church of Leiston, the daughter of Jonas and Mary Baxter of Sizewell. I believe Jonas should be Joseph, as Jonas and Mary Baxter had son Jonas in 1834 and go on to have a daughter Elizabeth in 1847.

Census

1841

Dwelling – Near the Church, Friston
Name Age Occupation Born in County
Joseph Baxter 45 Ag Lab Y
Mary Baxter 45   Y
Anna Baxter 13   Y
Elizabeth Baxter 7   Y
Onesimus Baxter 5   Y
Martha Baxter 3   Y
James Tailor 2   N

1851

Dwelling – Worlingworth
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Joseph Baxter Head M 58 Annuitant Leiston
Elizabeth Baxter Daughter Unmar 17   Aldringham
Martha Ann Baxter Daughter   13   Aldringham
Zillia Mary Baxter Granddaughter   3 m   Worlingworth

Mary Baxter was visiting her son Samuel Pipe Baxter in 1851

1861

Dwelling – Street, Sweffling
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Joseph Baxter Head M 65 Annuitant Leiston
Mary Baxter Wife M 65   Great Glemham
Zillia Mary Baxter Granddaughter   10   Worlingworth

1871

Dwelling – Rendham
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Mary Baxter Head Wid 75 Annuitant Great Glemham
Martha Baxter Daughter Unmar 33   Aldringham
Mary Haywood Lodger   75 Annuitant Straton Aspect

Tithe

Joseph appears in the tithe apportionments for Thorpe 1841 as the owner and occupier of between one and twenty acres of land likely to consist of smallholdings or large house.

Crime

Name Age Session Trial Date Charge Out come
Joseph Baxter junior   Norwich Jul 1828 Conspiracy to defraud Acquitted

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
Bury and Norwich Post 31 Jul 1822 Causes
The King V Baxter (Special Jury) – This was an information filed against the defendant for unlawfully endeavouring to persuade one Thomas Jackson to forbear to seize certain goods, and to induce him to comply, offering him a bribe of 300 guineas to allow defendant to run 5 cargoes into his district – In support of the prosecution, Thomas Jackson, a Lieutenant in the Navy and an officer in the preventive service at Southwold, was called, who distinctly proved that on the 22nd August last defendant had offered the bribe as stated in the information, which on the following day he reported to Mr Muller, his Superior Officer, who was called to confirm it. On behalf of the defendant witness were called to prove that on the 21st of August the defendant and his son left Ipswich by the night coach to London, where they both were on the 22nd and remained there till 24th, when they returned. Several witness were called to substantiate these facts, and the Judge having summed up, the Jury found a verdict for the defendant, but at the same time expressed their belief in Mr Jackson’s evidence, but having doubt, gave the benefit to the defendant.
Bury and Norwich Post
The Ipswich Journal
30 Mar 1825
02 Apr 1825
The King V Baxter and Murrells. Special Jury. – This also was on information similar to the last, filed against the defendants for offering a bribe to Richard Steel, an officer of the Preventive crew, stationed at Sizewell, for the permission of running a cargo of goods on shore. Richard Steel was called who proved that on the 10th of February, 1824 he went to the house of a person named Fisher, where he found several persons. He went again on the 12th; the defendants were then present. Witness sat down and Fisher left the room. Baxter then said “We had better talk of what we have to do”; and Murrell added “We are come to do a little business if we can. The question is – will you leave us an opening for a cargo; if you will, you shall be rewarded for your trouble.” Witness replied “such a thing might be done, bur it was a serious matter – and asked what they intended to give? Murrell first offered a fourth of the cargo; then 20l; but witness said he would not run the risque for double the sum.” Afterwards Murrells offered 30l. and witness said, “will you give guineas?” to which the defendants consented. It was then agreed the cargo should be landed the next dark, the amount of 500 tubs Upon cross-examination of the witness, he admitted that he had been sent to the defendants for the purpose of trying whether they would offer a bribe, and that he was to appear to consent to the offer. Mr Eagle and Mr Dover having made able defences for the two defendants, called Mr. Fisher to prove that Steel had employed him to get a meeting with the defendants, and that at such meeting Steel made the proposal to the defendants to land what goods they liked, if they would give him 100l,; this they refused, when he dropped to 50l. and then to 30l. Other witnesses were called, who stated that they would not believe Steel upon his oath. Mr Sergeant Frere replied at some length and his lordship having summed up returned a verdict of guilty.
The Ipswich Journal 07 May 1825 J Baxter and J Mailing, convicted at the Suffolk Assizes of offering a bribe to a revenue officer were yesterday brought up for judgement and sentenced to 5 months imprisonment in Ipswich Gaol: to pay a fine of 50£ with sureties for 5 years.
The Ipswich Journal 19 Apr 1828 At Norwich session of Tuesday last the Grand Jury returned a bill against Charles Baxter, line draper, late of Ipswich; William Baxter late of this city, liner draper and Joseph Baxter, the younger of Sizewell for a conspiracy to cheat the creditors of William Baxter.
William Baxter, John Elliott and Robert Phelp, were indicted for a conspiracy to defraud the creditors of William Baxter.
They were guilty and John Elliott was sentenced to two years imprisoned in the gaol, and to pay a fine of 100£ to the King, and Phelp to one years imprisonment, and to pay a fine of 50£ and both to be imprisoned till their respective fines were paid.
The Ipswich Journal 24 May 1828 In the Matters of Baxter.- Mr. Platt applied to the Court for a writ of Habeas Corpus, directed to the keeper of Newgate, to bring up the body of a person of the name of Baxter, in order to his being discharged. He had been committed by the Commissioners of Bankrupts for not answering to their satisfaction in his examination relative to the goods of his brother William, who had become a bankrupt, and absconded.
Lord Tenterden – Was that the person who we had before us the other day.
Mr. Platt. – No; it was another member of the family. The Commissioners had committed seven or eight of them. The ground upon which he moved for the writ was that there was a defect in the warrant of commitment, and that the examination was in itself perfectly satisfactory. Mr. Platt then commented on the examination, in which, he submitted, the witness had answered very fairly and satisfactorily, and that, unless he was to be confined for ever, he ought not to remain in custody any longer on this charge. Ordered to be brought up before a Judge at Chambers.
The Ipswich Journal 03 Mar 1838 At Aldringham near Aldeburgh
To be sold by Auction
By Samuel Flick
On Friday next, the 9th day of March 1838
The live and dead farming stock, and part of the household furniture, and other effects, upon the farm in the occupation of Mr. Joseph Baxter, jun. Catalogue will be distributed in the neighbourhood, and may be had of the Auctioneer, Saxmundham

Death

Rendham United Reform Church

Buried Name Comment
11 Dec 1866 Joseph Baxter Of Rendham aged 73
05 Dec 1874 Mary Baxter Of Rendham aged 78

Betsey Baxter (1794 – 1874)

Marriage

Betsey married Robert Phelps (1789 – 1831) 5th February, 1819, Heveningham.

Robert and Betsey’s first child is William Joseph Phelps, Robert is recorded as being a Heveningham coachman to Lord Huntingfield. Their second son Benjamin Baxter Phelps baptised 24 Sep 1820 Ubbeston. Benjamin dies at the age of 84 in 1904 in Poplar.

Betsey’s second husband was William Stodgell (1777 – 1855) the son of Thomas Stodgell and Mary Parsons, who she married on the 22nd October, 1838, St Martin In the Fields.

Mary Baxter (1797 – 1803)

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
15 Jan 1803 Mary Baxter Daughter of Joseph and Sarah Baxter aged 5 years

William Baxter (1799 – 1799)

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
11 Jun 1799 William Baxter Son of Joseph and Sarah Baxter

Charlotte Baxter (1800 – 1839)

Marriage

Marriage License Bond: 21 Apr 1823 – Miller and singleman of Friston and singlewoman of Leiston. To be married at Leiston.

Charlotte married Charles Gildersleeves (1801 – 1855) the son of Robert Gildersleeves and Jane Barfoot. From the parish registers of Leiston:
"Charles Gildersleeves of the parish of Friston, single man and Charlotte Baxter of this parish, single woman, married in this church by licence this twenty-second day of April, 1823. In the presence of Joseph Baxter and Sophia Holden."

Scipia Baxter (1802 – 1822)

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
Bury and Norwich Post 14 Aug 1822 Died
Yesterday se’nnight…Same day, at her brother’s house, Ipswich, in her 20th year, Miss S. Baxter, fourth daughter of Mr Joseph Baxter, of Sizewell, in this County.

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
09 Aug 1822 Scipia Baxter Spinster of St Mathews Ipswich, 20 years

William Baxter (1803 – ?)

According to the information that I have gathered from newspaper reports, William was a draper for a short period in Norwich, in 1827. He went bankrupt and absconded rather than face the legal consequences of the time. The newspapers suggest that William either fled for Holland or America. His brothers, Charles, Joseph and Benjamin, brother-in-law Robert Phelps, along with others spent time in both Newgate and Fleet Prisons.

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
London Gazette 30 Nov 1827 Bankrupts –
Baxter William, Norwich Draper
Bury and Norwich Post 05 Dec 1827 In WILLIAM BAXTER’S Bankruptcy
REWARD
Whereas there is reason to believe, that Linen Drapery and Other Goods and Effects belonging to this estate, to a considerable amount, have been clandestinely removed from the late premises of the Bankrupt, in London Lane and St Stephen’s, Norwich, and such goods are still withheld.
THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE
That whoever will give information, either to Green and Ashurst, Solicitors, Sambrook Court, Basinghall Street, London, to Parrinton and son, 22, Milk Street, Cheapside, London, or to Mr. Hallam on the premises, St Stephen’s, Norwich; whereby the said goods, or any part thereof, may be recovered will be paid the Reward allowed by the statute; and Notice is hereby given, that any person concealing the property of the said Bankrupt, or any part thereof, will be liable to forfeit, the sum of 100l and double the value of the goods so concealed, and will be prosecuted according to the law.
London, November 30, 1827.
Bury and Norwich Post 12 Dec 1827 Robert Gising a shopman of William Baxter, of Norwich draper was on Thursday last committed to Newgate by the Commissioners in Baxter’s bankruptcy, for not answering to their satisfaction questions propounded to him, with reference to the bankrupt’s affairs. We understand that Baxter’s debts contracted in Norwich amount to 6000 l and the property left for his creditors to 2000 l.
Bury and Norwich Post 19 Dec 1827 Robert Gissing, late shopman to William Baxter, of St Stephen’s Norwich, draper, a bankrupt, have been committed to Newgate, by the Commissioners, for not answering to their satisfaction questions, put to them relating to the bankrupt and his dealings. We understand Baxter in 10 months contracted debts to amount of 6,000 l or there abouts, and has absconded, leaving property amounting to 2000 l only to satisfy them.
Bury and Norwich Post 23 Jan 1828 The City Grand Jury was occupied a long time, on Tuesday, upon an indictment preferred against William Baxter, a bankrupt, late draper in St Stephen’s Street, his brother-in-law, Robert Phelp, late publican at Huntingfield; John Elliott, alias Telford, and his brother Robert Telford Elliott, late drapers in Norwich; for conspiracy to cheat Baxter’s Creditors, by removal of goods from his premises prior to his bankruptcy. Numerous witnesses were examined, and eventually a true bill returned against all parties named. The Learned Recorder in the course of the evening, on the application of Mr Evans, who stated the charge to be one referring to property of great magnitude, fixed the amount of the recognizance for the defendants appearing and taking their trial to be, each of the principals 200 l, and two sureties of 100 l each.
Bury and Norwich Post 23 Apr 1828 The Session for the city commenced yesterday se’nnight, before P Finch, esq. Mayor, Mr Recorder …son, and a full bench of Magistrates.
Robert Phelp, John Telford (otherwise John Elliott) and Robert Telford (otherwise Robert Telford Elliott) were indicted for a conspiracy to removing certain goods, the property of Wm. Baxter, late of this city, linen draper, a bankrupt, has absconded; his name was in the indictment. John Elliott was brought down in the Custody of the tipstaff of the King’s bench; Robert Elliott and Robert Phelp {surrendered} in discharge of their bail. No evidence was found against R. Elliott and he was immediately discharged. The case excited considerable interest; commenced about three o’clock in the afternoon, and occupied the attention of the Court till half-past ??? – William Gissing deposed that he had been shop-man to the bankrupt; that he first lived with the bankrupt in St. Stephen’s, who afterwards took a shop in Cockey-lane, which shop witness carried on for the bankrupt in the name of the witness. In October last the shop was given up, and witness took the books of the bankrupt. Witness knew at that time that the bankrupt was in difficulties. Baxter said he must return the books, in order to alter the sums there set down for expenses, &c. to enable him better to {attend} to his creditors for the deficiency; the books were burnt by Baxter in witness’s presence. Soon after this several parcels of goods were packed up by Baxter for the purpose of removing; the first parcels were taken away by Baxter in a gig; they were sars???, Bandana handkerchiefs, and other goods. J. Elliott had frequently been there previous. Baxter told Elliott he was insolvent, and could not meet his bills which were coming soon. Does not recollect the reply J. Elliot made then; but on another conversation heard Elliott say, if he were Baxter he would cheat his creditors as much as he could-he would make them repent arresting him- he would remove goods. Witness heard Elliott say similar things several times. The witness then detailed the circumstance of a quantity of goods being subsequently packed into a cart at night, by J Baxter, Phelp, Elliott, and witness, and driven away by Phelp, who lived at Huntingfield, in Suffolk. Witness afterwards packed up some more goods, which Baxter took away himself. The witness confessed having sworn before the Commissioners that he knew of no fraudulent removal – His evidence was corroborated by many other witnesses. The prisoners were both found Guilty. Elliot was sentenced to two years imprisonment and a fine of 100 l; Phelp to only one year’s imprisonment and a fine of 50 l on account of the good character he received from several respectable witnesses and by letter from Lord Huntingfield.
The Grand Jury found a bill of indictment against Charles Baxter and Joseph Baxter, jun. brothers of the bankrupt, for conspiracy to defraud the creditors of William Baxter; and on an affidavit of Mr Ashurst, London, Solicitor to the Commission, stating remands for believing that the defendants, who are at present in custody, having been committed by the Commissioners, intend to abscond, they were ordered to enter into recognizances, themselves in 400 l and their bail in 200 l. each. Charles Baxter, it is stated, had taken passage for America in a false name.
The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser 19 Sep 1828 New Intelligence
Norwich Session, April 21
Conspiracy to defraud Creditors
William Baxter, John Elliott and Robert Phelp, were indicted for conspiring to defraud the creditors of the said William Baxter, a bankrupt, by removing goods from the premises of the bankrupt {?} The bankrupt had not appear to take his trial, having absconded since the issuing the commission. Mr W, Ashurst, of London, Solicitor to the Commission proved Baxter’s bankruptcy.
William Gissing deposed, that he was shopman to Wm Baxter, who set up business in Norwich, in January, 1827, and had for a time two shops, in one of which witness conducted the business in his own name. That shop was shut up in October, and Baxter burnt the account-books. Witness then went to attend the business in Baxter’s {other/house}, who soon after told him that he was in embarrassed circumstances; and told John Elliott, in witnesses‘ presence , that he was insolvent Elliott said in reply, that if he were Baxter he would cheat his creditors as much as he could, by removing his goods, he would make them repent threatening to arrest him. Several parcels of goods were soon after packed up, and placed in the tea-room up stairs, which was always locked after that, but never before. Baxter took away the first parcel containing {?} and Bardamn handkerchiefs, in a gig on Saturday the 3d of November, Phelp (who was married to Baxter’s sister) and Elliot came Baxter’s house, and stayed the whole day, packing up goods. Elliott said, ‘We must be staunch to each other, and not tell any one that any goods have been removed.” Elliott in talking about the Commissioners of Bankrupt, said, ‘If we are summoned before them, me must say we know nothing – they have no power to administer an oath, but swear persons to make them {but} what they know.’ Phelp said; ‘We must be pippins,’ by what he meant staunch. Sometime after tea, Phelp bought a cart to the side door, into which six or seven parcels were put, containing the most valuable part of the stock {canshell} ribbons and {laces} worth at least £1,000. Phelp drove the cart and Baxter and Elliot went with it. Witness afterward packed up some goods, which Baxter took away himself. There was no entry of these goods made in Baxter’s book. A few days after, Phelp came again, and took away a muff, and eight or ten valuable shawls of which no entry was made witness afterwards heard Phelp tell Baxter that the goods were all safe. Witness concealed some goods and a £10 parcel of silver in the roof. After Baxter left Norwich he wrote to witness, desiring him to send him the parcel of silver and his clothes. Witness sent him the silver, but could not send him his clothes, as the messenger under the commission was in possession of the house. On his cross examination, the witness admitted that he had denied any knowledge of the removal of the goods on examination before the commissioners of Bankrupt, by whom he was committed to Newgate. He did not at the time believe that the oath administered by the commission was binding.
James Nicholls, shopman, and Sarah Spauton, a servant of Baxter, gave similar evidence respecting the removal of goods.
William Hallam, clerk to Mr Parrington, accountant, London, stated that he was sent down by the bankrupt’s creditors in London, to take an account of his stock. He found that he had purchased goods between 1st of September and 17th of November, to the amount of 1,600 l, and that his debt amounted to 6,000 l. In consequence of information he had received he searched the house and discovered in the roof a quantity of shawls, lace veils, gros-de-Naples, and ten pound worth of silver. So secret was the place of concealment that he would not have found, had he not been directed to it. Elliott asked witness whether they expected to get any of the goods back, witness replied he thought they should; when Elliott said Baxter had places and trap at his brother’s at Sizewell, which they could not find out. Elliott added, that if he were {indem?ited} he would take them to where there was property concealed worth 2,000 l to 3,000 l. Mr Parrington proved, that on the 19th of March last, Phelp was arrested in a bed-room in a house in Bermondsey, which was refused to be open, till a threat was made to break it open. Phelp then said he had a hand in removing the goods, and was duped as well as the rest.
This was the case for the prosecution.
The Prisoner’s council addressed the jury and called four witnesses, who gave Phelp an excellent character. The jury deliberated three quarters of an hour, returned a verdict of guilty against the prisoners Elliott was sentenced to two years imprisonment, and to pay a fine of 100 l. Phelp to one years imprisonment and a fine of 50 l. The case excited great interest, and occupied the court from four in the afternoon to eleven at night. – On Tuesday the Grand Jury returned a true bill against William Baxter, late of Norwich, Linen-draper, the bankrupt Charles Baxter, late of Ipswich, linen-draper and Joseph Baxter, the younger, for conspiracy to cheat the creditors of William Baxter. An application was made to court, on the affidavits of Mr Ashurst and Mr Parrington to increase the recognisance of the defendants. The affidavits stated that C Baxter had taken passage on board a vessel to Liverpool, and shipped goods in the fictitious name of Barton and the deponents believe he intended to leave the kingdom William Baxter had already absconded.
The court ordered the defendants who are in custody, to enter into recognisances, themselves in £400 and their bail in £200. The Solicitors have prosecuted their inquires, and two more of the family Joseph and Benjamin Baxter have since been committed to prison.
Bury and Norwich Post 28 Jul 1830 Dividend Meeting
W. Baxter, Norwich Draper, August 13
Bury and Norwich Post 10 Nov 1830 Dividend Meetings
Baxter W Norwich Draper, Nov 23

Ann Baxter (1806 – 1838)

Marriage

Ann married William Artis (1800 – 1840) the son of Benjamin Artis and Trypheane King. From the parish registers of Leiston:
"William Artis of the parish of Leiston, single man and Ann Baxter of the parish of Sizewell, single woman, married in this church by banns this sixth day of February, 1830. In the presence of Mary Baxter and Benjamin Artis."

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
Bury and Norwich Post 17 Feb 1830 Married
On Saturday se’nnight… Same day, at Leiston, Mr W. Artist, draper and tailor, to Miss Ann Baxter, of Sizewell, in this County.

Benjamin Baxter (1809 – 1887)

Marriage

Benjamin married twice. His first wife was Amelia Ward (1814 – 1879) possibly the daughter of James and Charlotte Ward, 18th May, 1839, Ipswich St Mathews. His second wife was Mary Ann Stacey (1829 – 1894) who he married in 1880. After Benjamin’s death Mary married John Gobbett, 27th October 1891.

Children

Benjamin and Amelia adopted the following child:

Born Baptized Name Comment Where
1853 23 Mar 1859 Benjamin Baxter Brown Son of Mary Ann Brown Parish Church of Bramford

I can not find a birth registration for either a Benjamin Baxter or a Benjamin Brown. I am uncertain whether Benjamin Baxter was the father of Benjamin Baxter Brown, he and Amelia, brought the child up as their own.

Census

1841

Dwelling – High Street, Aldeburgh
Name Age Occupation Born in County
Benjamin Baxter 30 Farmer Y
Amelia Baxter 25   Y
Mary Ward 15 FS Y
Frederic Artis 10   Y

1851

Dwelling – Bramford Street, Bramford
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Benjamin Baxter Head M 41 Grocer Sizewell
Amelia Baxter Wife M 36 Bonnet Maker Oakley

1861

Dwelling – Bramford Street, Bramford
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Benjamin Baxter Head M 54 Grocer Sizewell
Amelia Baxter Wife M 46   Oakley
Benjamin B Baxter Son   8 Scholar Ipswich
Amelia Farrow Visitor   12   Hoxne

1871

Dwelling – Bramford Street, Bramford
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Benjamin Baxter Head M 61 Grocer Sizewell
Amelia Baxter Wife M 56   Oakley

1881

Dwelling -Church Green, Bramford
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Benjamin Baxter Head M 71 Ag Lab Leiston
Mary Ann Baxter Wife M 52   Bramford

1891

Dwelling – Poor Houses, Bramford Road, Bramford
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Mary Ann Baxter Head Wid 62   Bramford

Directories

Directory Name Year Place Private / Commercial Name and Service
Suffolk History Gazetteer and Directory 1844 Aldeburgh Commercial Straw Hat Mkrs
Baxter Amelia
Whites History, Gazetteer & Directory of Suffolk 1855 Bramford Commercial Baxter, Benjamin – Shopkeeper
Post Office Directory of Cambs, Norfolk, Suffolk 1869 Bramford Commercial Baxter Benjamin – Grocer & C

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
Bury and Norwich Post 21 May 1828 Ex-parte Benj. Baxter – Mr Pratt appeared for a habeas corpus to bring up Baxter, committed for prevaricating in his examination under the bankruptcies of Wm. Baxter and Charles Baxter – The learned Counsel contended that his answers were as precise as possible. The writ was granted, returned before a Judge at Chambers.
Bury and Norwich Post 09 Jul 1828 In the Court of Chancery on Saturday, Mr Barber moved that Benj. Baxter, who had been committed for not giving sufficient answers at his examination on his brother’s bankruptcy, should be brought up to be re-examined – The Learned Gentleman stated that the petitioner, who had been twice committed to Newgate because the Commissioners were not satisfied, had in May offered to submit another examination, and it was agreed he should be brought up on paying 7l, for the expenses of a meeting; but the Solicitor refused to accept the sum without an undertaking on the part of the Petitioner’s Solicitor for payment of all const consequence upon the examination – Mr Barber contended that this condition would be tantamount to perpetual imprisonment. The Lord Chancellor said this as the costs of the meeting arose from the gross misconduct of the prisoner, they ought to be paid by himself; but it was unreasonable to require the undertaking of his solicitor. His Lordship therefore ordered him to be brought up for re-examination on tendering the costs of the meeting.
Bury and Norwich Post 30 Jul 1828 Court of Chancery, Jul 25
Re Baxter – Mr Pepys stated to his Lordship that this was a motion for Habeas Corpus, that the prisoner Benj. Baxter (who was witness examined under a Commission issued against Charles Baxter, his brother) might be brought up and discharged. The Lord Chancellor said, it is quite clear that this is a case of gross fraud and perjury from beginning to end. The question, on the original examination, were evaded by this witness, he denied that he knew anything certain bag of money; and when he was confronted by another witness, he admitted the fact of his knowledge of such money. This proved his unwillingness. If he thinks proper to go before any public meeting of the Commissioners, and make further and satisfactory answers to their examination; he may do so, and he will then be discharge. At present he must take the consequences of his own fraud and perjury.
The Suffolk Chronicle 30 May 1840 UNFURNISHED HOUSE, TO LET,
For the season, or by the Year,
A Pleasant COTTAGE, situated at Sizewell Gap, with capital sea view, suitable for a small genteel family, with gig-house and stable, 4 miles from the fashionable bathing town of Aldbro’; also, 4 miles from Saxmundham, where 3 coaches are daily passing to London.
For further particulars apply by letter, pre-paid, to Mr. Joseph Baxter, Sizewell; or to Mr. Benjamin Baxter, Aldbro’.
The Ipswich Journal 18 Mar 1854 William Cain, 22, pleaded guilty on two charges having by false pretences obtained 5s 6d from Benjamin Baxter of Bramford and 5s 6d from Elizabeth Shaul of Burstall, the prisoner having pretended that he was the inspector of weights and measures. Nine months hard labour.
The Ipswich Journal 26 Nov 1864 & 03 Dec 1864 Cooks, housemaids and general servants may hear of situations by applying at the Register Office Bramford
Mrs B. Baxter
London Gazette 16 Jul 1875 The Bankruptcy Act, 1869
In the County Court of Suffolk, holden at Ipswich
In the Matter of Proceedings for the Liquidation by Arrangement or Composition with Creditors, instituted by Benjamin Baxter, of Bramford, in the County of Suffolk, Grocer and General Shop Keeper.
Notice is hereby given, that a First General Meeting of the Creditors of the above named person has been summoned to be held at the Office of Mr Robert Raby Hill, Attorney, Saint Nicholas-Street, Ipswich, in the County of Suffolk, on the 6th day of August, 1875, at three o’clock in the afternoon precisely. –Dated this 13th day of July, 1875.
Robert R Hill, 30, Saint Nicholas-Street, Ipswich, Attorney for the said Benjamin Baxter.
The Ipswich Journal 21 Aug 1875 The Bankruptcy Act 1869
In re Baxter in liquidation
To be sold at Auction
By Ross Christopherson
Early in September
A desirable Freehold property, situated at Bramford, containing shop, parlour, storehouse, kitchen, bake room, capital cellar, three bedrooms, small garden and warehouse at back. A good baking and grocery trade has been carried out by the late proprietor.
Full particulars with date of sale next week
The Ipswich Journal 28 Aug 1875 & 04 Sep 1875 Bramford Suffolk
To Grocers, bakers, Pork Butchers, And others
To be sold at Auction
By Ross Christopherson
On Tuesday, September 7th 1875 at Seven O’clock p.m. prompt at the Crown and Anchor Hotel Ipswich
A freehold dwelling house, with front shop, bake office with 20-stone oven, large store cellar, warehouse, back yard &c, situated in the best part of the populous village of Bramford.
The property had been for many years in the occupation of the late, proprietor, Mr Baxter, and this sale offers a good opportunity to any seeking an old-establish business, capable of large improvement by a pushing man.
Full particulars may be had of Mr R. R. Hill Solicitor; Mr J. F. Titchmarsh, public accountant; and of the Auctioneer, all of Ipswich.
The Ipswich Journal 29 Apr 1876 The Bankruptcy Act 1869
In the county of Suffolk holders at Ipswich, in the matter of a special resolution for liquidation by arrangement of the affairs of Benjamin Baxter of Bramford in the county of Suffolk grocer and general shop keeper
The creditors of the above-named Benjamin Baxter who have not already proved their debts, are required on or before the 13th day of May, 1876, to send their names and address, and the particulars of their debts or claims to me, the undersigned John Frederick Titchmarsh, of 17, Princes Street, Ipswich, the Trustee under the Liquidator, or in default thereof, they will be excluded from the benefit of the dividend proposed to be declared.
Dated this 29th day of April 1876. J. F. Titchmarsh, Trustee
London Gazette 02 May 1876 The Bankruptcy Act, 1869
In the County Court of Suffolk, holden at Ipswich
In the Matter of Proceedings for the Liquidation by Arrangement or Composition with Creditors, instituted by Benjamin Baxter, of Bramford, in the County of Suffolk, Grocer and General Shop Keeper.
The Creditors of the above named Benjamin Baxter who have not already proved the debts, are required, on or before the 13th day of May, 1876, to send their names and addresses, and particulars of their debts or claims, to me, the undersigned, John Frederick Titchmash, of 17 Princess-Street, Ipswich, the Trustee under the liquidation, or in default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of the Dividend proposed to be declared. – Dated this 29th day of April, 1876.
J. F. Titchmarsh, Trustee.
The Ipswich Journal 25 Oct 1879 Baxter – 18th inst., at Bramford, Amelia, the beloved wife of Benjamin Baxter
East Anglian Daily Times 05 Nov 1879 BRAMFORD GREEN, NEAR IPSWICH
MARTIN CRANNIS
Is instructed by Mr. Benjamin Baxter to SELL by AUCTION, on MONDAY Next, Nov. 10th, 1879, at 12 o’clock, the
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE and Effects, on the premises near the church, comprising fenders and fireirons, Turkey, Kidderminster, and other carpets and rugs, pair glasses, two writing desks, American clock, mahogany dining, card, and other tables, mahogany and other chairs, two easy chairs, mahogany frame couch,
PLATE AND PLATED ARTICLES,
mahogany chest of draws, commode, cane seated chairs, dressing tables and glasses. Washstands and ware, iron and wood bedsteads, mattress, 3 Feather Beds and bedding, bedside stand, kitchen utensils, saucepans, boilers, pair Dutch ovens, iron pot, glass, earthenware, shop counter, scales and weights, saws and cleavers, pork pot, hoe stool, and other effects.
The Ipswich Journal 08 Jan 1887 Baxter – 6th inst. At Church Green, Bramford, in his 78th year, Benjamin, the beloved husband of Mary Ann Baxter, for several years trades man in Bramford, greatly respected.
The Ipswich Journal 31 Oct 1891 Gobbett – Baxter – 27th October, at All Saints Church, Ipswich, John Gobbett, ex-inspector, Ipswich to Mary Ann Baxter, widow of the late Benjamin Baxter, of Bramford.

Death

Bramford St Mary

Buried Name Comment
23 Oct 1879 Amelia Baxter Of Bramford aged 65
13 Jan 1887 Benjamin Baxter Of Bramford aged 77

What happened to the children of David Baxter and Ann Coote of Leiston?

David Baxter (1797 – 1826)

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
16 Feb 1826 David Baxter Of Leiston aged 28

Susanna Baxter (1799 – 1851)

Marriage

Susanna married Henry Garrod (1786 – 1854) the son of James Garrod and Mary Newson. From the parish registers of Leiston:
"Henry Garrod of this parish single man and Susanna Baxter of this parish single woman, were married in this church by banns this ninth day of July, 1820. In the presence of Anna Baxter and Thos Taylor."

Sheming Baxter (1803 – 1861)

Some times spelt Shiming, Sheming disappears from the parish register in 1830 he emigrated to America settling in Long Island, New York state.

Marriage

Sheming married Mary Ann Cater (1809 – 1861) the daughter of William Cater and Sarah Royal. From the parish registers of Leiston:
"Sheming Baxter of this parish single man and Mary Ann Cater of this parish single woman were married in this church by banns this sixth day of September, 1825. In the presence of John Cater, Eleanor Cater and Thos Taylor."

Children

Sheming and Mary had the following:

Born Baptized Name Comment Where
  30 Jul 1826 Elizabeth Eleanor Leiston {sailer} harnesser crossed out Parish Church of Leiston
  20 Feb 1828 Sarah Leiston Collar Maker Parish Church of Leiston
  17 Oct 1829 Elizabeth Eleanor Leiston Harness maker Parish Church of Leiston
c. 1834   William D   At Sea
c. 1846   Charles   New York
c. 1846   Sarah   New York

Census

1850

Dwelling – New York City, Ward 14, New York City
Name Family Number Age Occupation Birth Place
Henry* Baxter 79 45 Saddler England
Mary A Baxter 79 42   England
Wm Baxter 79 17 Brass Founder New York
Sarah Baxter 79 6   New York
Chas Baxter 79 6   New York

* For some reason Sheming changed his name to Henry

1851

Dwelling – 4 Ladies Row, Lakenham, Norfolk
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
William Cater Head M 73 Superannuate Officer of Excise Lakenham
Sarah Cater Wife M 73 wife Norwich
Mary A Baxter Daughter M n/k Nil Wickham Market
Charles Baxter *Son   6   America, New York
Sarah Baxter *Daughter   6   America, New York
Elizabeth Homersham Granddaughter S 26   Robinhoods Bay, Yorkshire
* Should be Grandson and Granddaughter

1855

Dwelling – New York City Ward 10
Name Relationship Age Occupation Birth Place
Sheming Baxter Head 50 Saddler England
Mary Ann Baxter Wife 48   England
William Baxter Child 23 Brass Founder England
Charles Baxter Child 10   New York
Sarah Baxter Child 10   New York
Hannah Baxter Boarder 18   New York

1860

Dwelling – New York 1st D 10 Ward Page 70
Name Family Number Age Occupation Birth Place
Shennway* Baxter 620 56   England
Mary A Baxter 620 54   England
Wm Baxter 620 26   New York*
Chas Baxter 620 15   New York
Sarah Baxter 620 15   New York

*Should be Sheming
* In the 1880 census William D Baxter states he was born at sea, this would perhaps explain why on 18th October, 1853 he petitioned for naturalization. His father Sheming applied for naturalization on the 31st January, 1860.

Directories

Directory Name Year Place Private / Commercial Name and Service
City Directory of Boston, Massachusetts 1837 Boston Commercial Baxter Sheming – Harnessmaker {64 Hanover}
City Directory of Boston, Massachusetts 1838 Boston Commercial Baxter Sheming – Harnessmaker {8 Hanover h. 31 Garden}

Book/Publication

Book/Publication Date Comment
Exhibition By Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, Boston 1837 726 Sheming Baxter, Boston. A Gig Harness. Highly creditable to the manufacturer; and the committee cheerfully commend it to particular notice, being made entirely of American Stock.
New York Times 04 Apr 1861 BAXTER. — In this City on Wednesday, April 3, of consumption, MARY ANN, wife of Sheming Baxter, aged 52 years.
The relatives and friends of the family, also the members of Perseverance Lodge No. 17, I.O.O.F., are respectfully invited to attend the funeral, from her late residence, No. 5 Orchard-st., on Friday afternoon, at 2 o’clock, without further invitation.
New York Herald 02 Oct 1861 BAXTER. Sheming, died September 30, aged 55. Of 5 Orchard Street

* I.O.O.F = Independent Order of Odd Fellows

Will Information

In 1846 William Cater wrote his will, in which he declares his daughter Mary Ann to be "… wife of Sheming Baxter now of Long Island State of New York, America Harness Maker…"

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
23 Feb 1828 Sarah Baxter Of Leiston 3 weeks
06 Apr 1829 Elizabeth Baxter Of Leiston 2+ years

Mary Ann Baxter (1806 – 1893)

Children

Mary Ann had the following:

Baptized Name Comment Where
06 Jun 1824 Emma Daughter of Mary Ann Baxter. Leiston Parish Church of Leiston

Marriage

Mary Ann married twice. Her first husband was Henry Jex Drew (1805 – ?) the son of James Drew and Elizabeth Jex. From the parish registers of Leiston:
"Henry Drew of this parish single man and Mary Ann Baxter of this parish single woman were married in this church by banns this fourth day of December, 1827. In the presence of William Baxter and {C} Baxter."

Her second husband was William Hart (1809 – 1887) the son of William Hart and Elizabeth Thrower, who she married in 1845.

From information that I have Mary Ann’s first marriage was a difficult one and when her husband left her she ended up in poverty. Below is a summary of a case in which Mary Ann Baxter (Mrs Drew) came before the Board of Guardians of the Blything Union which followed the publication of letter in the Suffolk Chronicle of 23 July 1836, entitled an ‘Illustration of the treatment of the poor under the new fangled poor Law’

Evidence was taken from Drew; Mr Panks, Relieving Officer 2nd Division; Aldrich, Landlord of the Angel Inn at Wangford; Mrs Aldrich, wife of the publican; Dr Lay, Surgeon 2nd Division; and Emma Baxter, illegitimate daughter of Drew. Drew stated she is married belonging to Wangford, late of Frostenden, but now resident in the workhouse at Bulcamp. Her husband, a tailor by trade, previously lived in Leiston, left her six years ago and moved away giving no support. Drew has four children; the eldest is 12 years old, bastard, belonging to Leiston; she has two children by her husband, aged nine years and seven years; the fourth child is an infant of seven weeks, the father being Thomas Day. Day now lives in Norfolk. Drew was in receipt of three shillings relief from Wangford up to February 1836. From February until her confinement she received 3s 6d per week. She did not apply for an increase as Day had promised to marry her. Panks, alerted by neighbours, called four days after confinement and increased her relief to 6s 6d, gradually reducing to 4s 6d. On Monday 11 July 1836 Drew collapsed on her way to attend the meeting of the board of guardians at the workhouse, and Mrs Aldrich took her in. As she did not attend the meeting her relief was stopped. Drew did not call Lay until Tuesday evening and was given medicine for ague. On Wednesday morning the overseer sent a note; Lay’s assistant attended Drew; and she received 4s 6d relief via Panks daughter. Drew had no complaint about her treatment or allowances until they were stopped. Panks stated he had regularly relieved Drew while she was living at Frostenden, and again for three weeks after her confinement. As she did not attend the Board relief could not be paid until she requested a medical certificate. Panks was in the bar at the Angel Inn, Wangford, when Aldrich, in front of 10-12 people told him he had dealt badly with Drew. Panks responded it was none of his business to which Aldrich replied ‘as a rate payer it was’. Aldrich confirmed Drew was at the inn on 11 July 1836 where she was given breakfast and then taken home in the fish van. Although Drew was weak he did not deem it necessary to call the doctor. Mrs Aldrich confirmed Drew had collapsed in the street, and also thought Drew had been well treated by Panks. Baxter called at the inn on Wednesday to say Lay would call on her mother on Thursday. Mr Potter was present when Baxter said her mother’s relief had been stopped, and Mrs Aldrich believes it was Potter who told the magistrates. Lay confirmed that an application for a medical order had been made in his absence, which his assistant sent. The overseer asked Lay to visit Drew on Wednesday, but he sent his assistant who had issued the certificate. Baxter stated she visited Lay on Tuesday 12 July 1836 for medicine for ague. Mr Rackham, Lay’s assistant gave it to her. She applied to Mr Adams, Overseer, on Tuesday evening and again on Wednesday morning, when she took the note to Lay. She saw Rackham who said he would visit Drew. Baxter returned to the inn and told Aldrich, in the presence of Potter, that Panks could not give relief to her mother until the medical certificate was issued; she also told Mrs Aldrich that Rackham was going to visit her mother. When Baxter returned home Panks’ daughter had already delivered the money

Jonas Baxter (1807 – 1869)

Marriage

Jonas married Mary Scares (1809 – 1893) the daughter of Gowen Scarse and Elizabeth Westrup. From the parish registers of Leiston:
"Jonas Baxter of the parish of Leiston single man and Mary Scares of the parish of Leiston single woman were married in this church by banns this twenty-sixth day of May, 1830. In the presence of Sheming Baxter and Mariah {L}ing."

Children

Jonas and Mary had the following:

Born Baptized Name Comment Where
  12 Oct 1830 Jonas Son of Jonas and Mary Baxter, Leiston Butcher Parish Church of Leiston
  1832 Shimming   Leiston
  21 Sep 1834 Jonas Son of Jonas and Mary Baxter, Leiston Butcher Parish Church of Leiston
  25 Jun 1837 Charles Son of Jonas and Mary Baxter, Leiston Butcher Parish Church of Leiston
  29 Apr 1838 Horace Son of Jonas and Mary Baxter, Leiston Butcher Parish Church of Leiston
1840   Caroline Mother’s maiden name Scarce Leiston
1842   Anna Mother’s maiden name Scarce Leiston
1845   Frederick   Woodbridge
1847 22 Aug 1855 Elizabeth Daughter of Jonas and Mary Baxter, Leiston Butcher Parish Church of Leiston

Census

1841

Dwelling – Leiston Street Leiston
Name Age Occupation Born in County
Jonas Baxter 30 Butcher Y
Mary Baxter 30   Y
Shimming Baxter 9   Y
Jonas Baxter 9   Y
Charles Baxter 5   Y
Caroline Baxter 9 mths   Y

1851

Dwelling – Leiston
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Jonas Baxter Head M 43 Butcher Leiston
Mary Baxter Wife M 41   Leiston
Shimming Baxter Son   19   Leiston
Charles Baxter Son   15   Leiston
Horrace Baxter Son   12 Scholar Leiston
Caroline Baxter Daughter   10 Scholar Leiston
Emma* Baxter Daughter   8 Scholar Leiston
Frederick Baxter Son   5 Scholar Leiston
Elizabeth Baxter Daughter   3 Scholar Leiston

*Anna?

1861

Dwelling – Snape Road, Leiston
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Jonas Baxter Head M 53 Butcher Leiston
Mary Baxter Wife M 57   Leiston
Anna Baxter Daughter   18 Dressmaker Leiston
Frederick Baxter Son   15 Tailor Leiston
Elizabeth Baxter Daughter   13 Scholar Leiston
Caroline L Baxter Granddaughter   1   Newcastle on Tyne

1871

Dwelling – High Street, Leiston
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Mary Baxter Head Wid 61 Dressmaker Leiston
Frederick Baxter Son Unmar 25 Colt Breaker Leiston
Annie Baxter Granddaughter   5   Leiston
Elizabeth Lindoff Daughter M 23 Dressmaker Leiston
Gabriel Lindoff Grandson   2   Leiston

1881

Dwelling – Aldeburgh Road, Leiston
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Mary Baxter Head Wid 71   Leiston
Gabriel Lindoff Grandson   13 Scholar Leiston

1891

Dwelling – Sizewell Road, Leiston
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Mary Baxter Head Wid 71   Leiston
Walter Gobbet Broader   17 Groom Halesworth

Tithe

Jonas appears in the tithe apportionments for Leiston 1841 as the occupier of less than one acre likely to consist of cottages, shops or gardens.

Crime

Name Age Session Trial Date Charge Out come
Jonas Baxter 35 Beccles 27 Jun 1842 Larceny Imprisonment 1 month

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
The Ipswich Journal 02 Jul 1842 Jonas Baxter, 35, pleaded guilty of having stolen from a stable a peck and a half of beans, the property of Richard Garnett of Leiston. The prosecutor strongly recommended the prisoner to mercy on account of previous good character, A memorial to the same effect was read, signed by the minister, church wardens, overseers, and other inhabitants of Leiston. Not withstanding their recommendations, and the evident contrition of the prisoner, he was sentenced to one month imprisonment.
Halesworth Times 07 May 1861 GAME.
Jonas Baxter, of Leiston, butcher, was charged with having, on Sunday, the 7th April, at Westleton, unlawfully taken a hare, and was fined the sum of 5s. and 10s. 6d. costs, which he paid.
The Ipswich Journal 05 Jun 1869 Deaths. Baxter – 1st inst., at Leiston, Mr Jonas Baxter.
Beccles and Bungay News 08 Jun 1869 Deaths. On the 1st June, Mr Jonas Baxter colt breaker, etc Leiston.
Framlingham Weekly News 2 Jun 1869 DEATHS
BAXTER -1st inst., at Leiston, Mr Jonas Baxter, colt breaker, &c.
The Ipswich Journal 14 Jan 1893 Baxter – 9 th January, at Sizewell Road, Leiston, Mary relict of the late Thomas* Baxter, aged 83.
The Ipswich Journal 14 Jan 1893 Leiston
…three more deaths have occurred in the parish of Leiston this week, all of them women far advanced in life. Two them, Mrs Mary Baxter, of Sizewell Road, and Mrs Mary Fisher of Dimsdale Cottages, were octogenarians having each passed their 82nd birthday and 83rd
Framlingham Weekly News 14 Jan 1893 DEATHS
BAXTER – 9th inst., at Sizewell Road, Leiston, Mary, relict of the late Thomas* Baxter, aged 83 years.

* Should be Jonas, not Thomas.

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
07 Jun 1869 Jonas Baxter Of Leiston aged 63
14 Jan 1893 Mary Baxter Of Leiston aged 83

Emma Baxter (1810 – 1810)

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
14 Nov 1810 Emma Baxter Daughter of David and Ann Baxter, Coote Spinster

What happened to the children of William Baxter and Sarah Gillingham?

Charlotte Baxter (1807 – ?)

Charlotte’s husband, George (St John’s Newcastle-Upon-Tyne) joined the army in 1825 and as a couple they moved around a lot. They had children in Clewer near Windsor, Berkshire, Knightsbridge, London and Poringland, Norfolk. In 1851 the family was in Chapel Place, Kensington, where George was recorded as a Chelsea Pensioner. There’s non sign of the family in the 1861 census. George, I believe died in 1852, and Charlotte either remarried or died before 1861.

Marriage

Charlotte married George Elliot/t (1803 – 1852) before their daughter Sarah Elizabeth was born in 1838.

William Baxter (1810 – 1888)

William got into trouble for stealing 11 sovereigns, in 1827, his death sentence was commuted to 14 years transportation. He sailed on the Phoenix, departing England on the 4th March, 1828, and arriving in Port Jackson, NSW on the 14th July, 1828.

Marriage

William married Mary Martin (1823 – 1876) the daughter of Thomas Martin and Sarah Nowlan, on the 18th May, 1840, Jamberoo, Camden. In the presence of Alexander Stewart and Robert Menzies

Convicts application to marry
William Baxter, Phoenix (3) Aged 30; sentence 14 years; condition: Ticket of Leave to Mary Martin. Aged: 23; Born in Colony; Condition: Free. Minister, Revd J Tait of Wollogong
Ticket of Leave. Mr Robb describes him as industrious and well conducted

Children

William and Mary had the following:

Born Name Comment Where
1849 William Son of William and Mary NSW
1852 James Son of William and Mary NSW
1853 David James Son of William and Mary NSW
1854 Sarah Ann Daughter of William and Mary Kiama
15 Feb 1856 Teresa Mary Daughter of William and Mary Kiama
1858 Mary E Daughter of William and Mary Kiama
1859 David Son of William and Mary Kiama

Records

Ticket of Leave – 1837
BAXTER William – Phoenix – 1828 – District: Illawarra; Tried: Suffolk ass

Certificate of Freedom – 07 Mar 1842
Prisoner number: 28/1274 – Name: William Baxter – Ship: Phoenix 3 – Master: {Burgeus}
Year: 1828 – Native Place: Snape in the county of Suffolk
Trade or calling: Lath Minder – Offence: House breaking
Place of Trial: Suffolk Assizes – Date of Trial: 2 Aug 1827 – Sentence: 14 years
Year of birth: 1810 – Height: 5ft 10 inches – Complexion: Ruddy – Hair: Brown – Eyes: Blueish.
General Remarks; Long scar under right eye brow. (Tattoos) M.A.W inside left arm, two hearts, left thumb dislocated.

Employment

1828 – William worked as part of a road gang
1841 – William was working for James Robb at his Riverdale Estate
1855 –
William buy half an acre of land from Thomas Alexander Reddall at the east end of Addison Street, Shellharbour.
1856 –
William advertised his ketch, the "William and Ann," from Shellharbour to Sydney

Census

1841

Port Philip, Burke, NSW
County, Parish, Town or District:- Illawarra
Name of Householder, Employer of servants or persons in charge:- William Baxter
Place of Residence and Street in Town:- Riverdale Residence
What is the name of the Person at the head or in charge of this house or establishment:- William Baxter
And who is the porperty owner:- James Robb
Is the dwelling house build of stone, of brick or of wood:- Wood
Is it complete or unfinished:- Completed
Is it inhabitated or uninhabitated:- Inhabitated
How many persons arw residing in this establishment including yourself:- Two
How many of those persons are free:- One
1 married female between the ages of 14 and 21
1 married male between the ages of 21 and 45
1 born on the colony
1 holding ticket-of-leave
1 male: Shepherds and others in the care of sheep, Gardeners, Stock men and Persons employed in Agriculture
1 female: All other persons not included in the foregoing classes.

Directories

Directory Name Year Place Private / Commercial Name and Service
The Merchant Navy List and Maritime Directory 1867 Shellharbour Commercial William Baxter
Greville’s Post Office Directory 1872 Shellharbour Commercial

BAXTER W. sen.
Master mariner – Addison St.

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
The Ipswich Journal 21 Jul 1827 Commitments to County Gaol and House of Correction. Wm. Baxter, committed July 3, by Rev. L. R. Browne, charged with having stolen eleven sovereigns, the property of Robt. Jarvis, of Tunstall
The Bury and Norwich Post 8 Aug 1827 Suffolk Assizes
Prisoners
Of the 17 prisoners convicted at these Assizes, 10 had sentence of death recorded against them, viz…
William Baxter, for stealing 11 sovereigns from the dwelling-house of Robert Jarvis, of Tunstal.(sic)
The Ipswich Journal 08 Sep 1827 The following convicts were removed from the County Gaol, in this town, on Monday last and put on board the Leviathan hulk, at Portsmouth, viv. Sampson Curtis, Moses Long, John Burleigh, Samuel Clow and James Cook for life, and Wm. Baxter for fourteen years.
The Kiama Independent and Shoalhaven Advertiser 09 May 1876 Local and General News
…Within the last few days, several other deaths have occurred, some of which we can but mention, not having been made acquainted with any particulars regarding them. On Thursday night or Friday morning last died, at an advanced age, the wife of Mr. William Baxter, an old resident of Shellharbour. Mr. Baxter being himself at the time in Sydney, whither he had resorted for medical treatment, and where he remains in a very precarious state.
The Kiama Independent and Shoalhaven Advertiser 27 Oct 1876 SHELLHARBOUR
SHELLHARBOUR. TESTIMONIAL TO CAPTAIN BAXTER — A meeting for this purpose was held in the Council chamber on Tuesday evening.
Mr. Wm. Fryer was voted to the chair.
The chairman in introducing the proceedings, at some length dealt upon the past history of Mr. Baxter in connection with Shellharbour and his worthiness to the grateful consideration of the old inhabitants of the district. A motion was unanimously passed affirming the propriety of raising a testimonial to Captain Baxter; and the following gentlemen were appointed a committee for the purpose: Messrs. H. Dunster, T. Fenwick, D. Buckley, W Allen, P. Wright, Wm. Fryer sen, Wm. Fryer jun., T. Counghrane, J. H. Deane, E. Prior, T. Buckley; J. Downey, T. Farraher, Wm. Stewart, M. Flannagan, J. Fraser,-Mr H Dunster to be treasurer, and Mr. D. Buckley secretary. Mr.Dunster read a note from Mr. Dymock, enclosing a cheque for two guineas. Mr. Fenwick and other speakers warmly advocated the movement. A subscription list was opened, and the sun of £25 was subscribed in the room. A vote of thanks to the chairman terminated the proceedings.
Illawarra Mercury 15 Dec 1876 DINNER AND TESTIMONIAL TO CAPTAIN BAXTER.
On Saturday evening last, about 40 gentlemen sat down to an excellent dinner, prepared by Mr. Coughran, in the Council Chamber. Some of the old friends Of Captain Baxter, considering that he was entitled to some recognition for long past services in the shipping trade of this place, having raised a handsome testimonial determined that its presentation should take place at a public dinner. Alderman Fenwick presided.’ The member for the district, Captain Charles, was present. The usual formal toasts were drunk with enthusiasm, and ‘ Our Guest’ was given with vigorous demonstrations of good will. In speaking to this toast, the chairman gave a very interesting detail of Captain Baxter’s long connection with the shipping ‘trade of the place, and graphically depicted the condition of things in the early settlement of Shellharbor, and eulogized Captain Baxter’s conduct in assisting the early settlement of the place, and presented him with a cheque for, 100 guineas.
The Captain in a feeling and appropriate man-‘Nor replied.’
In responding to ‘The Parliament,’ Captain Charles gave a detail of some of the actions of the Parliament during the past session’, find stated that the efforts of the Ministry in useful legislation would have been much more successful had there not been such extraordinary factious opposition to their measures.
Alderman Bigg proposed ‘ Our Member.’.
In responding, Captain Charles gave an interesting resume of events in the early history of the settlement of Shellharbour, and bore testimony to the industry and application of Captain Baxter in furthering the interests of the pioneers of the place. Captain Charles also gave, an account of his own career in the colony, which evidenced what can be done by integrity, industry, and perseverance. ‘The Chairman,’ ‘ The Vice-Chairman,’ and ‘The Host and, Hostess’ being ‘given, and God save the Queen sung, the party dispersed.
The Kiama Independent and Shoalhaven Advertiser 21 Aug 1888 OBITUARTY.
CAPTIAN BAXTER is the name by which one of the oldest inhabitants of Shellharbour was known, and who departed this life on Saturday morning last at the ripe old age of 78 years. His Christian name was William and he was, we believe, the first to open shipping communication about fifty years ago, between Shellharbour and the metropolis, in fact he for some time commanded his own vessel; and continued master of the trade until the introduction of the Dairymaid, or steam communication by the people of Shellharbour. He was a shrewd man of business, well-known all along the coast, and esteemed by all who knew him. Some ten, or it may be twelve, years ago, he was the subject of cataract eye disease, and since that time has been totally blind. His latter days were rendered comfortable by the care and affection of his daughters, Mesdames Craig and Bishop, and the solicitude of many friends. His sons, James and David, were also with him nearly to the last. The cause of death may fairly be said to be decay of nature. His remains were interred yesterday afternoon. Many old friends attended and the funeral services were performed by the Rev. Father Corcoran, to whose church the deceased belonged.
The Sydney Morning Herald 24 Aug 1888 BAXTER – August 19. At the residence of his daughter, Mrs John Craig, Shellharbour, Captain William Baxter, age 78 years.

Death

Shellharbour Old Sand Cemetery

Buried Name Comment
May 1876 Mary Baxter Died 06 May from Typhoid fever
Aug 1886 William Baxter Died 19 Aug 1886, aged 78 from decay of nature. The son of William Baxter

Mary Anne Baxter (1811 – 1812)

Death

Tunstall St Michael

Buried Name Comment
25 Apr 1812 Mary Anne Baxter Infant daughter of William and Sarah Baxter

Sarah Anne Baxter (1814 – ?)

Parish Records

Snape:- Removal order Sarah Ann Baxter, single woman from Snape to Tunstall, 27th October, 1832.

What happened to the children of Benjamin Artis Baxter and Harriot Barber of Walpole?

Harriet Baxter (1816 – 1896)

Marriage

Harriet married John Buckingham (1816 – 1895) son of Robert Buckingham and Hannah Aldous, on the 1st January, 1839, Heveningham.

What happened to the children of Joseph Baxter and Mary Pipe?

Mary Anne Baxter (1817 – ?)

I am unable to locate Mary after the 1851 census.

Marriage

Mary married James Taylor (1807 – ?), the son of Herbert and Sarah Taylor.

Parish Church of Newington St Mary – 1st August 1837
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
James Taylor Full age Bachelor Licensed Victullar 17 Amelia Street Herbert Taylor Deceased
Mary Ann Baxter The same Spinster   5 East Street Joseph Baxter Farmer
In the presence of us: Micha Samson, Elizabeth Hudgull & Sophia Baxter

Sophia Baxter (1819 – 1900)

Marriage

Sophia married Stephen Tingle (1803 – 1886) son of Stephen Tingle and Eleanor Buckle.

Parish Church of Bermondsey St James – 7th July, 1840
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
Stephen Tingle Full age Bachelor Courier John Street Stephen Tingle Dead
Sophia Baxter Full age Spinster   John Street Joseph Baxter Farmer
In the presence of us: Joseph Baxter & Fanny Fry

Joseph Baxter (1820 – 1841)

Marriage

Joseph married Fanny Fry (1818-?) daughter of William Fry and Elizabeth Tribeck.

Parish Church of Newingon Saint Mary – 21st October, 1840
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
Joseph Baxter Full age Bachelor Coachman 19 Newington Causeway Joseph Baxter Farmer
Fanny Fry The same Spinster   The same William Fry Bricklayer
In the presence of us: Wm Williams & Maria Mason

After Joseph’s death Fanny married William Matthew Arkell, 17th October, 1843.

Census

1841

Dwelling – Shalford House, Shalford, Surrey
Name Age Occupation Born in County
Fanny Baxter 25 FS N

Death

Camden St Pancras Parish Church

Buried Name Comment
15 Aug 1841 Joseph Baxter Of University Hospital, aged 21

Charles Baxter (1823 – 1873)

Charles settles in Yoxford and has no children.

Marriage

Charles married Jane Clarke (nee Danbrook, 1805 – 1886) the daughter of James Danbrook and Sarah Smith, on the 12th October, 1847, Yoxford.

Census

1841

Dwelling – Hall Farm, Sternfield
Name Age Occupation Born in County
Charles Baxter 16 MS Y

1851

Dwelling – Yoxford
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Baxter Head M 27 Ag Lab Sizewell
Jane Baxter Wife M 41   Darsham
Mary Ann Clarke Daughter-In-Law* Unmar 19 Domestic servant Beccles
William Clarke Son-In-Law* Unmar 17   Beccles

*Recorded as in law, but actually step children.

1861

Dwelling – Yew Tree House, Yoxford
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Baxter Head M 37 Ag Lab Sizewell
Jane Baxter Wife M 54   Darsham

1871

Dwelling – Poplar Tree House, Yoxford
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Baxter Head M 47 Ag Lab Leiston
Jane Baxter Wife M 63   Darsham
William Clarke Grandson   13 Scholar Aldbro
Stephen Clarke Grandson   10 Scholar Aldbro

1881

Dwelling – Great Street, Yoxford
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Jane Baxter Head Wid 75   Darsham
Stephen Clarke Grandson Unmar 20 Ag Lab Aldbro

Death

Yoxford St Peter

Buried Name Comment
30 Jan 1873 Charles Baxter Of Poplar Tree, Yoxford, aged 49
14 Jan 1886 Jane Baxter Of Peter Leigh’s Yard, Yoxford, aged 80

Samuel Pipe Baxter (1826 – 1885)

Samuel moved around for work living in Sweffling, Great Glemham, Parham before finally settling in Framlingham.

Marriage

Samuel married three times. His first wife was Eliza Everrett (1824 – 1858) the daughter of Noah Everrett and Judith Fairweather, who he married in 1846. His second wife was Esther Mayer, the widow of Thomas Mayer (1816 – 1878) who he married in 1859. His third wife was Mary Ann Nichols (1847 – 1892) the daughter of Samuel Nichols and Martha Abbott, who he married in 1879.

Children

Samuel and Eliza had the following:

Born Baptized Name Comment Where
1847 12 Dec 1847 Samuel Joseph Son of Samuel and Eliza Parish Church of Great Glemham
1849 15 Apr 1849 Charles William Son of Samuel Pipe and Eliza Parish Church of Great Glemham
1850 17 Jan 1851 Mary Eliza Daughter of Samuel Pipe and Eliza Parish Church of Sweffling
1853   Onesimus George Mother’s maiden name Everett Sweffling
1855 24 Jun 1855 Susannah Sarah Daughter of Samuel Pipe and Eliza Parish Church of Sweffling
1857 05 Jul 1857 Eliza Anna Daughter of Samuel Pipe and Eliza Parish Church of Great Glemham

Samuel and Mary Ann had the following:

Born Name Comment Where
1877 Mary Jane Nichols Mother’s maiden name Nichols Framlingham
1880 Martha Eliza Mother’s maiden name Nichols Framlingham
1882 George Robert Mother’s maiden name Nichols Witnesham

Census

1841

Dwelling – Upper Abbey, Leiston
Name Age Occupation Born in County
Samuel Baxter 15 Ag Lab Y

1851

Dwelling – Sweffling
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Samuel Baxter Head M 25 Ag Lab Great Glemham
Eliza Baxter Wife M 27   Friston
Samuel Baxter Son   3   Great Glemham
Charles Baxter Son   2   Sweffling
Mary Baxter Daughter   6mth   Sweffling
Mary Baxter Mother M 55   Great Glemham

1861

Dwelling – {Comfort} House, Yeppers Lane, Great Glemham
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Samuel Baxter Head M 35 Ag Lab Great Glemham
Esther Baxter Wife M 45   Denton, Norfolk
Samuel Baxter Son   13   Great Glemham
Charles Baxter Son   12   Sweffling
Mary Baxter Daughter   10   Sweffling
Onesimus Baxter Son   8   Sweffling
Eliza Baxter Daughter   3   Great Glemham
James Mayer Step Son   15   Great Glemham
Sarah Mayer Step Daughter   10   Stuton
Hannah Mayer Step Daughter   8   Stuton

1871

Dwelling – North Green, Parham
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Samuel Baxter Head M 45 Farm Bailiff Great Glemham
Esther Baxter Wife M 46   Denton, Norfolk
John Mayer Step Son Unmar 27 Ag Lab Rendham
Charles Baxter Son Unmar 22 Ag Lab Sweffling
Eliza Baxter Daughter   13   Great Glemham
Ellen Mayer Granddaughter   5   Great Glemham
Charles Dendle Boarder Unmar 17 Ag Lab Dennington

1881

Dwelling – Badingham Road, Framlingham
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Samuel Baxter Head M 55 Farm Bailiff Great Glemham
Mary Ann Baxter Wife M 36   Framlingham
Jane Nichols Daughter   4   Framlingham
Martha Baxter Daughter   9 m   Framlingham

1891

Dwelling – Castle Street, Framlingham
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Mary A Baxter Head Wid 46 Pork Butcher Framlingham
Frederick A Nichols Son S 21 Assistant Pork Butcher Framlingham
Mary Jane Baxter Daughter   14   Framlingham
Martha E Baxter Daughter   10   Framlingham
George R Baxter Son   9   Framlingham
Emily P Nichols Niece   15 Assistant in shop (Butcher) Framlingham

Directories

Directory Name Year Place Private / Commercial Name and Service
Whites History, Gazetteer & Directory of Suffolk 1891-2 Framlingham Commercial Baxter Mrs Mary Ann – Pork Butcher and Shopkeeper, Castle Street

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
Framlingham Weekly News 03 Oct 1863 FRAMLINGHAM PETTY SESSIONS
Friday Sept 25th 1863
Samuel Baxter, of Great Glemham, labourer was charged with assaulting Hannah Core, wife of Joseph Core, of the same place, on the 28th August last by pulling her out of a field in which she went for the purpose of gleaning wheat. Complainant did not appear – Case dismissed.
Framlingham Weekly News 04 Apr 1885 DEATHS
BAXTER – 2nd inst., Samuel Pipe Baxter, of Framlingham, greengrocer, aged 59 years.
The Ipswich Journal 07 Apr 1885 Baxter – 2 nd inst., at Framlingham, Samuel Pipe Baxter, greengrocer, aged 59 years.
Framlingham Weekly News 13 Feb 1892 DEATHS
BAXTER – 10th inst., Mary Ann relict of Samuel Baxter, Castle Street, Framlingham, in her 48th year, after a long and lingering illness of one year and nine months, leaving five orphan children.

Will Information

1892
Effects £94 15s
Baxter Mary Ann of Framlingham Suffolk widow died 8 February 1892 Probate Ipswich 7 October to George Andrews superintendent of police.

Death

Great Glemham All Saints

Buried Name Comment
10 Jan 1858 Eliza Baxter Of Great Glemham, aged 33

Sweffling St Mary

Buried Name Comment
13 Dec 1878 Esther Baxter Of Parham, aged 64

Framlingham Cemetery

Buried Name Comment
08 Apr 1885 Samuel Pipe Baxter Of Framlingham, Greengrocer, died 02 Apr 1885, aged 59
15 Feb 1892 Mary Ann Baxter Of Framlingham, Widow of Samuel Pipe Baxter, aged 48

Sarah Baxter (1826 – 1914)

Census

1841

Dwelling – High Street, Aldeburgh
Name Age Occupation Born in County
Sarah Baxter 15 FS Y

Marriage

Sarah married William Fairweather Crane (1820 – 1899) in 1847.

Anna Baxter (1828 – 1920)

Census

1851

Dwelling – 43 Low Road, Lambeth
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Hannah Baxter S Unmar 23 Servant Bedfordshire

* I believe Hannah to be Anna and the Bedfordshire to be an error on her employers part. This Hannah Baxter was living with James and Rebecca Robinson, the same family to which Anna was working for in the 1861 to 1891 censuses.

1861

Dwelling – 28 Albert Square, Lambeth
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Anna Baxter Serv Unmar 32 Nurse Sizewell

1871

Dwelling – 28 Albert Square, Lambeth
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Anna Baxter Serv Unmar 43 Housemaid Sizewell

1881

Dwelling – 28 Albert Square, Lambeth
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Anna Baxter Serv Unmar 53 Cook Sizewell

1891

Dwelling – 7 Clarence Road, Streatham, London
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Anna Baxter Serv S 64 Housemaid Sizewell

1901

Dwelling – Uphampton, Ombersley, Worcestershire
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Sarah Crane Head Wid 74 Living on own means Suffolk
Sara Crane Daughter S 30   Heveningham
Mary Crane Daughter S 45   Waversley, Hunts
Anna Baxter Sister S 73 Living on own means Sizewell

1911

Dwelling – 46a Sale Hurst Road, Croft Park, Lewisham, London
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Martha Daniels Head Wid 73   Aldringham
Harry Onesimus Daniels Son S 25 General Clerk Plaistow
Anna Baxter Sister S 83 Retired Domestic Servant Sizewell
Clara Dainels Daughter S 28 Housemaid Stratford
Ellen McDowell Visitor S 27 Housemaid Islington

Death

Lambeth District

Buried Name Comment
1917 Anna Baxter Aged 89

Elizabeth Baxter (1834 – 1899)

Children

Elizabeth had the following:

Baptized Name Comment Where
22 Jun 1851 Zilliah Mary Daughter of Elizabeth Bayster* Parish Church of Great Glemham

*Error in parish registers.

Marriage

Elizabeth married George Harvey (1832 – 1875) the son of Richard Harvey and Lydia Vince, in 1853.

Onesimus Benjamin Baxter (1836 – 1875)

Onesimus spent much of his adult life in London.

Marriage

Onesimus married Elizabeth Horrex Mountseer (1835 – 1931) the daughter of Charlotte Mountseer.

Kensington & Chelsea Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Denbigh Road –
13th July, 1864
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
Onesimus Benjamin Baxter 28 Bachelor Servant Denmark House
Elizabeth Horrex Mountseer 29 Spinster   Westbourne Terrace
In the presence of us: Maurice Newman and Charlotte Newman

Children

Elizabeth had the following:

Born Name Comment Where
1866 Onesimus Arthur Mother’s maiden name Mountseer Lambeth District
1867 Onesimus Mountseer Mother’s maiden name Mountseer Kensington District
1869 Stanley Walter Mother’s maiden name Mountseer Kensington District

Census

1851

Dwelling – Rectory, Worlingworth
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Onesimus Baxter Serv   15 Footman Aldringham

1861

Dwelling – Denmark Hill, St Mary, Lambeth
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Onesimus Baxter Serv Unmar 25 Footman Aldringham

1871

Dwelling – 42 Finsbury Square, St Lukes, Finsbury
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Onesimus Baxter Serv Unmar* 35 Butler Suffolk

*Onesimus was living in his employers home and his marital status recorded as unmarried.

1871

Dwelling – Private House, Britannia Street, Shoreditch
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Elizabeth Baxter Wife M 36   Downham, Norfolk
Stanley W Baxter Son   1   Paddington, Middlesex

1881

Dwelling – 30 Park Lane W, London, Middlesex
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Elizabeth H Baxter Serv (Head) Wid 46 Housekeeper Wherham, Norfolk
Stanley W Baxter Son   11   London

1901

Dwelling – Shoreditch
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Elizabeth Baxter Head Wid 66 Living on own means Downham, Norfolk

1911

Dwelling -119 Grosvenor Road, Highbury, Islington, London
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Stanley Walter Baxter Head M 41 Private Tutor Paddington, Middlesex
Violet Mountseer Baxter Wife M 29 Domestic Duties Manea, Cambridgeshire
Elizabeth Horrex Baxter Mother Wid 76 Independent Downham Market, Norfolk
Robert Arget Boarder S 21 Student In Philosophy Steinen, Germany
Theodore Muller Boarder S 23 Commercial Clerk Stuttgart, Germany
Leonhard Junker Boarder S 20 Commercial Clerk Les Breuleux, Switzerland

Will Information

Onesimus Benjamin Baxter
Effects under £450
14 June 1875. The Will of Onesimus Benjamin Baxter formerly of Denmark Hill Lambeth in the County of Surrey but late of 7 Albert Building Leonard-Street Finsbury in the County of Middlesex Butler who died 30 May 1875 at 7 Albert Buildings was proved at the Principal Registry by Elizabeth Horrix Baxter of 7 Albert-Buildings widow the Relict the sole Executrix.

1931
Effects £450
Baxter Elizabeth Horrix of 119 Grosvenor Road Highbury Middlex, widow died 20 January 1931 Administration (with Will) London 23 March to Stanley Walter Baxter Boarding House Proprietor.

Death

Lambeth District

Buried Name Comment
1866 Onesimus A Baxter Infant

Kensington District

Buried Name Comment
1869 Onesimus Mountseer Baxter Aged 1

Shoreditch District

Buried Name Comment
1875 Onesimus Benjamin Baxter Aged 3{9}

Islington District

Buried Name Comment
1931 Elizabeth H Baxter Aged 96

Martha Ann Baxter (1837 – 1915)

Census

1881

Dwelling – 19 Coburg Road, Camberwell, Surrey
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Sarah Mathews Head Wid 77 House Property Newport, Shropshire
Elizabeth Bedall Niece Unmar 23   Donnington, Shropshire
Martha Ann Baxter Serv Unmar 43 Nurse (Dom) Aldringham

Marriage

Martha married Henry Daniels (1848 – 1901) son of Henry Daniels and Mary Self.

Parish Church of Camberwell Saint George – 22nd February, 1883
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
Henry Daniels Full age Bachelor Boot Maker Coling Road Henry Daniels Boot Maker
Martha Annie Baxter Full age Spinster   Coling Road Joseph Baxter Farmer
In the presence of us: Henry Edward Ling and Elizabeth Matilda Keddall

What happened to the child of Elizabeth Baxter?

Zilliah Mary Baxter (1851 – 1920)

Marriage

Zilliah married George Henry Bowyer (1845 – 1901) son of John Hill Bowyer and Lydia Base.

Parish Church of Rotherhithe All Saints – 22nd August, 1871
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
George Henry Bowyer Full Bachelor Labourer Rotherhithe John Bowyer Labourer
Zella Mary Baxter Minor Spinster   Rotherhithe Father’s name not known
In the presence of us: Henry Farmer Darwall and John Vincent

What happened to the son of Benjamin Baxter and Amelia Ward?

Benjamin Brown Baxter (1853 – 1911)

Benjamin appears in the census using either the surname Baxter or Brown.

Marriage

Benjamin married twice. His first marriage was to the divorcee Elizabeth Ward nee Le Grys (1858 – ?) the daughter of Robert Le Grys and Sarah Truss. That marriage ended in divorce in 1889.

The Register Office in the District of Marylebone – 1st October, 1884
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
Benjamin Baxter Brown 35 Bachelor Coachman (Domestic) 1 Chapel Mews, Duke Street    
Elizabeth Ward formerly Elizabeth Le Grys Spinster 25 The Divorced wife of Edward Charles Ward   1 Chapel Mews, Duke Street Robert Le Grys Gentleman
In the presence of us: Francis Usher and W. Willis

His second wife was Annie Jupp (1862 – ?) the daughter of William Jupp and Maria Hoare, who he married in 1891, Pancras district.

Children

Benjamin and Annie had the following:

Born Baptized Name Comment Where
1892   Bessie Baxter Mother’s maiden name Jupp Hatfield Broad Oak
1895   Alice Baxter Mother’s maiden name Jupp Hatfield Broad Oak
1897   Arthur William Mother’s maiden name Jupp Hatfield Broad Oak
1901 25 Aug 1901 Amy Baxter Fleet Coachman Parish Church of Fleet All Saints

Census

1871

Dwelling – Oakley
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Benjamin Baxter Serv Unmar 19 Helper (Groom) Ipswich

1881

Dwelling – 9 Seymour Mews, London, Middlesex
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Benjamin B Brown Boarder Unmar 28 Groom Domestic Servant Suffolk

1891

Dwelling – Heath Mansion, Hatfield Broad Oak, Essex
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Benjamin B Brown Head S 38 Coachman (Groom) Ipswich

1901

Dwelling – Calmwell, 4 Rochester Park, Fleet, Hampshire
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Benjamin Baxter Head M 48 Coachman Domestic Ipswich
Annie Baxter Wife M 39   North Mundham, Sussex
Bessie Baxter Daughter   8   Hatfield, Essex
Alice Baxter Daughter   6   Hatfield, Essex
Arthur Baxter Son   4   Hatfield, Essex

1911

Dwelling – Blenheim Cottage, Middle Street, Fleet, Hampshire
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Annie Baxter Brown Head Wid 49   North Mundham, Sussex
Bessie Baxter Brown Daughter   18 Shop Assistant Hatfield, Essex
Alice Baxter Brown Daughter   16 Nurse Maid Hatfield, Essex
Arthur William Brown Son   14 Errand Boy (Diary Farm) Hatfield, Essex
Amy Baxter Brown Daughter   9 School Fleet
Percival Baxter Brown Grandson   1   Fleet

Death

Fleet All Saints

Buried Name Comment
07 Jan 1911 Benjamin Baxter Brown Of Fleet, aged 58

What happened to the child of Mary Ann Baxter?

Emma Baxter (1824 – ?)

Census

1841

Dwelling – Leiston Hall
Name Age Occupation Born in County
Emma Drew* 15 FS Y

*Emma used her stepfather’s surname.

I lose Emma after this, I can find no marriage or burial for an Emma Baxter or Emma Drew or Emma Hart that fits the information that I have.

What happened to the children of Jonas Baxter and Mary Scarce of Leiston?

Jonas Baxter (1830 – 1830)

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
09 Nov 1830 Jonas Baxter Of Leiston infant

Shimming Baxter (1832 – 1908)

Shimming spent his early adult life in Leiston and Framlingham before moving to Newcastle Upon Tyne.

Marriage

Shimming married Lydia Aldred (1831 – 1915) the daughter of John Aldred and Mary Ann Seagon.

Parish Church of Framlingham – 26th May, 1856
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of Marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
Shimming Baxter Full age Bachelor Plumber Leiston David* Baxter Butcher
Lydia Aldred Full age Spinster   Framlingham John Aldred Labourer
In the presence of us: Jonas Baxter and Maria Nichols

*Should be Jonas Baxter

Children

Shimming and Lydia had the following:

Born Baptized Name Comment Where
01 Jun 1856 06 Jul 1856 Lydia Framlingham Glazier Parish Church of Framlingham
  16 Mar 1858 Emily Leiston Glazier Parish Church of Leiston
  08 May 1859 Lydia Ann Of Leiston Parish Church of Leiston
1860   Frederick James Mother’s maiden name Aldred Leiston
1862   Horace Mother’s maiden name Aldred Leiston

Census

1861

Dwelling – Sizewell Road, Leiston
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Shimming Baxter Head M 27 Painter & Glazier Leiston
Lidia Baxter Wife M 28   Framlingham
Lidia Baxter Daughter   2   Leiston
Frederick Baxter Son   11 m   Leiston

1871

Dwelling – 48 Dean Street, All Saints, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Shimming Baxter Head M 38 Painter Leiston
Lydia Baxter Wife M 39   Framlingham
Lydia Baxter Daughter   12 Scholar Leiston
Frederick Baxter Son   10 Scholar Leiston
Horace Baxter Son   8 Scholar Leiston

1881

Dwelling – 48 Dean Street, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Shimming Baxter Head M 49 Workman Painter Leiston
Lidia Baxter Wife M 50   Framlingham
Frederick Baxter Son Unmar 19 Workman Carpenter Leiston
Horace Baxter Son Unmar 18 Workman Plumber Leiston

1891

Dwelling -7 Water Street, Elswick, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Shimming Baxter Head M 59 Painter Leiston
Lydia Baxter Wife M 60   Framlingham

1901

Dwelling – 412 Scotswood Road, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Shimming Baxter Head M 69 House painter Leiston
Lydia Baxter Wife M 72   Framlingham
Robert Robinson Boarder   49 Ship Painter Newcastle Upon Tyne
Robert Groves Boarder   24 Living on own means Cumberland
Edward Swell Boarder   25 Farmers son Cumberland
Emma Baxter Granddaughter   7   Newcastle Upon Tyne

1911

Dwelling – 403 Scotswood Road, Elswick, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Horace Baxter Head M 48 License Victuler Leiston
Jane Baxter Wife M 48   Glasgow
Margaret Baxter Daughter S 20 Assisting in Business Newcastle Upon Tyne
Horace Baxter Son S 19 Assisting in Business Newcastle Upon Tyne
Lydia Baxter Daughter S 18 Assisting in Business Gateshead
Amy Baxter Daughter S 17 Assisting in Business Newcastle Upon Tyne
Charles Baxter Son   15 Assisting in Business Newcastle Upon Tyne
Robert Baxter Son   14 School Newcastle Upon Tyne
John Baxter Son   12 School Newcastle Upon Tyne
Jean Baxter Daughter   8 School Newcastle Upon Tyne
Richard Baxter Son   5 School Newcastle Upon Tyne
Evelyn Baxter Daughter   3   Newcastle Upon Tyne
Meggie Lilston Servant S 22 Domestic Servant Newcastle Upon Tyne
Lydia Baxter Mother Wid 84   Leiston

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
Evening Star 8 Dec 1908 DEATHS
BAXTER.- On December 2nd, at Newcastle-on-Tyne, Shiming Baxter, late of Leiston, aged 77.

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
26 Jan 1858 Lydia Baxter Of Leiston 11/2 years
20 Mar 1858 Emily Baxter Of Leiston 3 months

Newcastle Upon Tyne

Buried Name Comment
1908 Shimming Baxter Aged 74
1915 Lydia Baxter Aged 83

Jonas Baxter (1834 – 1881)

Like his brother Shimming, Jonas settles in Newcastle Upon Tyne.

Marriage

Jonas married twice. His first wife was Emma Fountain (d. 1859). From the parish registers of St Martin in the Field:
“Jonas Baxter of the parish of St Martin in the Field bachelor and Emma Fountain of the parish of St Marylebone in the same county spinster were married in this church by licence this twenty-sixth day of April, 1855.”

His second wife was Elizabeth Taylor (1848 – 1907), possibly the daughter of John and Mary Ann Taylor, who he married in 1862, Newcastle Upon Tyne.

Children

Jonas and Emma had the following:

Baptism Name Comment Where
16 Sep 1857 Emma Louisa Mary Daughter of Jonas and Emma Baxter Parish Church of Newcastle Upon Tyne All Saints
05 Oct 1859 Caroline Jane Daughter of Jonas and Emma Baxter of Dean Street, Photograph artist Parish Church of Newcastle Upon Tyne All Saints

Census

1851

Dwelling – Aldeburgh
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Jonas Baxter Serv Unmar 17 Groom Aldeburgh

1861

Dwelling – 48 Dean Street, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Jonas Baxter Head Wid 27 Photographer Aldeburgh
E. L. M. Baxter Daughter   3   Newcastle
Caroline Baxter Sister   20 Housekeeper Leiston

1871

Dwelling – 11 Princess Street, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Jonas Baxter Head M 35 Beer House Keeper Aldeburgh
Elizabeth Baxter Wife M 24   Newcastle
Emma Louise Baxter Daughter   13   Newcastle
Caroline Jane Baxter Daughter   11   Newcastle
Mary Pringle Taylor Sister-In-Law Unmar 25 Bar Maid Newcastle

1881

Dwelling – 48 Dean Street, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Jonas Baxter Head M 48 Photographer Aldeburgh
Elizabeth Baxter Wife   42   Newcastle

1891

Dwelling – Gilbertstone, Coventry Road, Solihull, Warwickshire
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Elizabeth Baxter Serv Wid 44 Cook Elswick, Newcastle

1901

Dwelling – Cramlington, Northumberland
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Elizabeth Baxter Serv Wid 56 Housekeeper Domestic Newcastle

Death

Newcastle Upon Tyne

Buried Name Comment
1859 Emma Baxter  
1881 Jonas Baxter Aged 48

Tynemouth District

Buried Name Comment
1907 Elizabeth Baxter Aged 62

Charles Baxter (1837 – 1922)

Charles moved away from Leiston to work in London.

Marriage

Charles married Catherine Elizabeth Murrow (1836 – 1921) the daughter of Henry and Jane Murrow

Parish Church of Saint Marylebone – 17th June, 1866
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
Charles Baxter Full aged Bachelor Tailor St Marylebone Jonas Baxter Butcher
Catherine Elizabeth Murrow Full age Spinster   St Marylebone Henry Murrow Coast Guard
In the presence of us: Charles Taylor Young and Charlotte Culhing

Children

Charles and Catherine had the following:

Born Baptized Name Comment Where
1868 30 Apr 1868 Charles Henry 39 Bolsover Street, Tailor Parish Church of Westminster Holy Trinity, Marylebone Road
1871 03 Dec 1871 Annie Murrow 22 New Street, Tailor Parish Church of Hampstead Saint Stephen The Martyr

Census

Charles is recorded twice in the 1861 census.

1861

Dwelling – Swallow Street, St Pancras
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Baxter Lodger Unmar 25 Tailor Leiston

1861

Dwelling – 12 White Crisp Street, St Giles, Cripplegate
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Baxter Visitor Unmar 24 Tailor Leiston

1871

Dwelling – 39 {Bolsover} Street, All Souls, St Marylebone, London
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Bayler Head M 34 Tailor Leiston
Catherine E Bayler Wife M 36   Aldebury

1881

Dwelling – 23 Fitzroy Street, Middlesex
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Baxter Head M 44 Tailor Leiston
Catherine E Baxter Wife M 46   Aldeburgh
Annie M Baxter Daughter   9 Scholar Portland Town, Middlesex

1891

Dwelling – St George Road, St Pancras
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Baxter Head M 55 Tailor Leiston
Kate Baxter Wife M 56   Aldeburgh
Annie Baxter Daughter Unmar 19 Dress Milliner’s Assistant Portland Town, London

1901

Dwelling – 37 St George Road, St Pancras
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Baxter Head M 65 Tailor Leiston
Kate Baxter Wife M 66   Aldeburgh
Annie Baxter Daughter S 29 Dress Milliner’s Assistant Portland Town, London
George A Stratton Visitor S 27 Pianoforte Worker Paddington

1911

Dwelling – 37 St George Road, St Pancras, London
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Charles Baxter Head M 75 Tailor C Maker Leiston
Catherine Elizabeth Baxter Wife M 76   Aldeburgh
Annie Murrow Baxter Daughter S 39   Portland Town, London

Death

St Pancras District

Buried Name Comment
1921 Catherine E Baxter Aged 86
1922 Charles Baxter Aged 87

Horace Baxter (1838 – 1920)

Horace moved away from Leiston to work in Southampton, he had no children.

Marriage

Horace married Martha Lanning (1831 – 1886) the daughter of James and Mary Lanning, on the 13th November, 1862, at Southampton St Peter.

Census

1861

Dwelling – Polygon, Southampton All Saints, Hampshire
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Horace Baxter Serv Unmar 23 Butler Leiston

1871

Dwelling – 1 Vectis Terrace, Southampton All Saints, Hampshire
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Horace Baxter Head M 33 Lodging Housekeeper Leiston
Martha Baxter Wife M 32   Portsmouth, Hants

1881

Dwelling – 1 Vectis Terrace, Southampton All Saints, Hampshire
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Horace Baxter Head M 42 Lodging Housekeeper Leiston
Martha Baxter Wife M 43   Portsmouth
Harriet Cosier Serv Unmar 21 General Servant Salisbury, Wiltshire

1891

Dwelling – 1 Vectis Terrace, Southampton All Saints, Hampshire
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Horace Baxter Head Wid 52 Boarding House Keeper Leiston

1901

Dwelling – 10 London Terrace, Southampton All Saints, Hampshire
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Horace Baxter Boarder Wid 58 Waiter Leiston

1911

Dwelling -Workhouse & School of the Southampton Union, St Mary Street, Southampton, Hampshire
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Horace Baxter Inmate Wid 73 Formerly Lodging House Keeper Leiston

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
Hampshire Advertiser 25 Dec 1886 DEATHS
On the 21st inst., at No. 1. Vectis-terrace, Southampton, Martha, the wife of Horace Baxter, in her 56th year.

Death

Southampton

Buried Name Comment
1886 Martha Baxter Aged 55
1920 Horace Baxter Aged 82

Caroline Baxter (1840 – 1912)

Marriage

Caroline married Edgar Moss (1824 – 1897) the son of Martha Moss on 3rd December, 1865, Ipswich St Mary Keys.

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
The Ipswich Journal 16 Dec 1865 Moss – Baxter – 3rd inst., at St Mary Key’s Ipswich, Edgar Moss to Caroline Baxter, of Leiston.

Frederick Baxter(1845 – 1923)

Marriage

Frederick married Sarah Ann Waters (1849 – 1912), the daughter of John Waters and Mary Ann Newson, on 20th November, 1871.

Children

Frederick and Sarah had the following:

Baptized Name Comment Where
10 Nov 1872 Kate Ellen Daughter of Frederick and Sarah Ann Baxter, Leiston Job Master Parish Church of Leiston

Census

1881

Dwelling – Sizewell Road, Leiston
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Frederick Baxter Head M 35 Colt Breaker Woodbridge
Sarah Baxter Wife M 32 Colt Breaker’s wife Kingsfield
Kate Baxter Daughter   8 Scholar Leiston

1891

Dwelling – Sizewell Road, Leiston
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Frederick Baxter Head M 45 Job Master Woodbridge
Sarah Baxter Wife M 46   Ringfield
Kate Baxter Daughter Unmar 19   Leiston

1901

Dwelling – Sizewell Road, Leiston
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Frederick Baxter Head M 56 Job Master, General Shopkeeper Woodbridge
Sarah Baxter Wife M 52   St Andrews

1911

Dwelling – 25 Sizewell Road, Leiston
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Frederick Baxter Head M 65 Jobmaster & Grocer Woodbridge
Sarah Ann Baxter Wife M 61 Assisting in Business St Andrews

Directories

Directory Name Year Place Private / Commercial Name and Service
White’s History Gazetteer & Directory of Suffolk 1891 -2 Leiston Commercial Baxter Fredk – Horse & trap & saddle letter, Sizewell Road
Kelly’s Directory of Cambs, Norfolk & Suffolk 1892 Leiston Commercial Baxter Frederick – Job Master, Sizewell Road
Kelly’s Directory of Suffolk 1900 Leiston Commercial Baxter Frederick – Job Master, Sizewell Road
Kelly’s Directory of Suffolk 1912 Leiston Commercial Baxter Frederick – Grocer, 23 Sizewell Road

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
The Ipswich Journal 06 Mar 1869 Framlingham Petty Session
A gentleman poacher – John Culley, gentleman, Aldeburgh and Fredk Baxter, colt breaker, Leiston were charged by Mr Dove, game keeper, to the Duke of Hamilton, with having, on the 13th of February at Hacheston, unlawfully used a dog viz. a greyhound, for the purpose of taking game- a hare. Mr Dove saw the defendants in a vehicle, on the 13th February, on the Saxmundham Road near Hacheston, with three greyhounds. When near a gate, Baxter got out of the vehicle and gave the reins to Culley who kept his seat. Baxter got over into a field of rye. The dogs following him into the field and put up a hare, run and killed it. Mr Baxter took the hare and put it into the vehicle.
Mr Hawkins, game keeper to Rev. Mr Williams, of Glevering Hall, said he was present at the coursing meeting at Orford, after the above occurrence. He saw both defendants there. Spoke first to Baxter, asked him if he knew what occurred on the 13th, he said, “Yes, I could not help it, they were not my dogs.” I then spoke to Culley, who said he thought he might make it up. I said I could not. Culley said it was an accident and he was sorry for it.
Mr. Culley, in defence, said : I ad been to Mr Barker’s to course, and was returning through Hacheston to Saxmundham, when a hare crossed the road, and the dogs went after it. I sad to Baxter, “Fred get out and get the dogs off. Baxter got out, but was too late, one of the dogs had killed the hare. I said, “It is no use leaving the hare there, it will not be seen in the rye, and will only be spoiled, put it in the vehicle.” I had no intention of killing the hare, the dogs went over the field after the hare, and Baxter went to get them off.
Mr. Dove recalled, said, Baxter went first into the field, the dogs following, Baxter pointing to where the hare was, and the dogs following. They rye was about six inches high. He could not say if the defendants could see the hare from the road, probably they might as they were sitting in their vehicle
Culley and Baxter were each fined £2 10s and costs 12s or six months imprisonment. The money was paid.
The Ipswich Journal 05 Jun 1880, 12 Jun 1880 & 19 Jun 1880 Leiston – Sizewell Road
Dwelling house cottage & Building land
Messrs Flick and Son
Are instructed by the Proprietress to sell by Auction, at the White Horse Inn, Leiston, on Monday 21st June 1880 at four for five o’clock precisely, in one lot.
A convenient brick, stone and tiled dwelling house, in two tenements together with a commodious barn; and numerous out buildings, productive and well planted gardens, orchard, pightle, occupied by Mr Fred Baxter and Mrs Cooper. Also a substantial brick and titled double cottage in the occupation of Messrs Warne and Philpot, and another cottage in the tenure of Mr Herbert Baldry, the whole producing at moderate rental £47 10s per annum, pleasantly situated in Leiston, adjoining the Sizewell Road, to which it has a frontage of about 120 feet, and covering an area of nearly one acre of land, which might be extensively utilized for building purposes. There is a well of excellent water on the property.
Tenure copy hold of the manor of Leiston
Particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained of Mr William Kent, Leiston; of Mr Richard lee Mayhew, Solicitor; and the Auctioneer, Saxmundham,
The Ipswich Journal 03 Apr 1886 Saxmundham County Court Friday October 20th
Negligent Driving
Frederick Baxter livery stableman, Leiston v George Bailey, Wherstead Road, Ipswich. – Claim for £5 4s., loss, etc., occasioned by defendant’s negligent driving.
The claim include items of £1 5s repair to a cart. £1 damage to harness, and £2 loss of earnings, in consequence of the illness of plaintiff’s pony.
Mr. J. M. Pollard appeared for the plaintiff; Mr. John Mills, Ipswich, for the defendant.
Mr. Pollard said the defendant was, on the 29th August, in Leiston, and on that day hired a pony and trap to go to Sizewell with, from the plaintiff, promising to take care of the animal as she was in foal, and to return early. He did not return until 1.30 the next morning, and then with the pony an part of the harness only, the art having been left in a dyke at the sluice, two miles out of Sizewell. The pony was very ill and incapacitated from work for several weeks, and the defendant refusing to come to any terms this action was brought.
Frederick Baxter, the plaintiff, said defendant owned that he had been down on the sluice at Sizewell and overturned the cart. When the cart was taken out of the ditch at the sluice the bottom fell out. The pony had since been very ill and the harness had been no use to him. He had been in the habit of getting about 25s. a week for hire of the pony, and the pony was out of work for six weeks in consequence of defendant’s treatment.
Cross-examined: It was not an old cart before the accident. All the damage which was paid for in the bill (produced) was done on that night. This sluice was not at Sizewell, and if a man paid for Sizewell he should not go any further. The pony was not 25 years old, she was only 20 years. He did not let the pony a month after the accident. He took the harness first into a shoemakers near. The reason he told the defendant the next day that the damage would be £1 was that he did not know its full extent, and was willing to meet the defendant half way. The foal would have been worth £10 to him, but it was lost after the accident.
Harris Woolnough, living at Leiston, said the defendant came to plaintiff for a trap to go to Sizewell, and to Sizewell only.
His Honour remarked that the only good of that witness’s evidence was the “only”.
Wm. Smith, veterinary surgeon said he was called in about the 20th September, 1881, to see the pony. The pony lost her foal, and he treated her accordingly, and she could not work for several weeks afterwards. It was a good and quiet pony. The overdriving might very likely have been the cause of the foal being lost.
Mr. Mills, for the defence, said that there was no carelessness or negligence on the part of the defendant. He was carefully walking the pony home, and it being very dark, the pony slipped and it fell into the dyke, and it was a pure accident. He characterised the claim of the plaintiff as extravagant, even if there were negligence.
George Bailey, the defendant, said he did not use the word “only” on hiring the trap. He went to Sizewell Sluice, a distance of about four miles from Leiston. He stayed near a gentleman’s named Walker, until 11.30, coming home by the Benthills, and about half-way along, as he was walking the pony, the cart suddenly upset into a dyke. It took him and another man about half an hour to get the pony out. He then went to see Mr Baxter about the accident. A few days later he met the plaintiff at the Royal Standard Inn, when the plaintiff claimed £1, and he (defendant) offered him 10s. He had seen the plaintiff on many occasions since on his visits to Leiston, and the plaintiff had been perpetually altering the claim: – first £3, then £10, then £6.
George Woolnough said he was at the Leiston Works at the time Bailey was there last year. It was about 14 months ago when he saw Baxter and the defendant together at the Royal Standard Inn, and the plaintiff told the defendant the “fee” was £1, and Buxton (sic) said he would give 10s. He himself hired the pony from the plaintiff about a month after the accident, and went to Aldeburgh with it. Baxter told them to be careful, for he believed that it was in foal then.
Cross-examined: It would be a little later than the present month, about November.
William Walker, Sizewell, said the defendant left his house about 11.30. He could only go by way of the Benthills, unless he went by the beach. He washed the cart the next morning. He did not think the cart was hurt.
His Honour said he supposed it was the better for the fall and
Witness announced, amid laughter, that he thought it was because it got well washed.
His Honour said this case was practically undefended. He had no doubt that the accident was caused by the negligence of the defendant. It was only another instance of how people would come into courts of justice and make statements that could not be believed. If he believed the statements of the defendant and his witnesses, the cart was the better for the fall, and also that the man to whom the cart was sent for, he believed, necessary repairs was simply making a new cart of an old one, and remedying previous damage. He was only sorry that respectable men could be found to come forward and make such statements. He should give judgement for the full amount with costs.
The Ipswich Journal 03 Apr 1886 Petty Session: Saxmundham Thursday April 1st
Keeping a dangerous dog
Frederick Baxter, Leiston, cab proprietor, was charged with being the owner of a dangerous dog, at Leiston on the 9th March – The Bench made an order that Baxter should keep the dog under proper control and to pay £1 2s 2d costs, which he paid.

Will Information

1924
Effects £154 15s 5d
Baxter Frederick of Central-Road Leiston Suffolk died 8 November 1923 Probate London 4 January to Kate Rowland (wife of Ernest Rowland).

Death

Leiston St Margaret

Buried Name Comment
1912 Sarah Ann Baxter Aged 63
1923 Frederick Baxter Aged 78

Elizabeth Baxter (1847 – ?)

Children

Elizabeth had the following:

Born Name Comment Where
1865 Annie/Anna Elizabeth* Mother’s maiden name left blank Leiston

*Another child was registered at the same time as Anna Elizabeth, Mary Lizzie. I can find no death, census or marriage information for Mary Lizzie.

Marriage

Elizabeth married twice. Her first husband was Gabriel Timothy Lindoff (1849 – 18??) son of Benjamin Ward Lindoff (Lindiff, Lindliff, Lindaff) and Elizabeth Brown, in 1868, Ipswich. Gabriel died before the 1881 census. Elizabeth’s second husband was John Henry Thornton (1856 – ?) the son of Moses Thornton and Mary Ann Cockerell.

Parish Church of Westminster Holy Trinity, Marylebone Road – 25th December, 1887
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
John Henry Thornton 31 Widower Joiner 139 Tichfield St Moses Thornton Joiner
Elizabeth Lindoff 39 Widow   139 Tichfield St Jonas Baxter (deceased) Butcher
In the presence of us: {Rose} Thornton, Florie Morsley & Louisa Gills

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
Framlingham Weekly News 18 Jul 1868 MARRIAGES
LINDOFF – BAXTER -27th ult., at the Register Office Ipswich, Mr Gabriel Lindoff, of Vernon Road, Bow, to Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Mr. Jonas Baxter, Leiston.

What happened to the child of Frederick and Sarah Ann Baxter of Leiston?

Kate Ellen Baxter (1872 – 1941)

Marriage

Kate married Ernest Rowland (1869 – 1937) the son of Joseph and Ann Rowland, on 28th May, 1893, St Peter’s Church Brighton.

Newspapers

Newspaper Date Comment
The Ipswich Journal 03 Jun 1893 Rowland – Baxter – 28 th May, at St Peter’s church, Brighton, Sussex, by special licence, Ernest Rowland, of Handcross, Sussex, to Kate Ellen Baxter of Leiston, Suffolk.
Bury and Norwich Post 06 Jun 1893 Rowland – Baxter – 28th ult., at St Peter’s church, Brighton, Sussex, (by special license), Ernest Rowland of Handcross, Sussex, to Kate Ellen Baxter, of Leiston, Suffolk.

What happened to the child of Elizabeth Baxter?

Anna/Annie Elizabeth Baxter (1866 – 1952)

Census

1881

Dwelling -35 Devonshire Street, London Middlesex
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Moses Thurstone* Head M 50 Joiner Middleton
Mary A Thurstone Wife M 50   Suston
John H Thurstone Son Unmar 25 Joiner London
Elizabeth Thurstone Daughter Unmar 21 Dressmaker Linton
Annie Baxter Visitor Unmar 15   Linton
Hannah Richardson Visitor Unmar 25   Bayhall
Bessie* Lindoff Visitor Unmar 33   Suston

*Not sure if the surname is Thurstone, Thurston or Thornton.
* Bessie Lindoff is Elizabeth Lindoff, Annie’s mother and John H Thurstone is her future step father.

1891

Dwelling -Westmorland House, Kirkley
Name Relationship Marital Status Age Occupation Where Born
Annie Baxter Serv S 25 Parlour Maid; Domestic Servant Leiston

Marriage

Annie married William Button (1866 – 1933) the son of John Mantle Button and Betsey Daniels.

Parish Church of Leiston – 26th December, 1891
Name and Surname Age Condition Rank or profession Residence at the time of Marriage Fathers name and surname Rank or profession of father
William Button 26 Bachelor Engineer St Leonard’s, Colchester John Button Carpenter
Annie Elizabeth Baxter 26 Spinster   Leiston Robert Smith Carpenter
In the presence of us: Gabriel Lindoff, Kate Ellen Baxter & Annie May Goodall